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CodeSection Title Instructor Quarter/Dates
MLINFO 15S2 Master of Liberal Arts Information Session tbd Spring 2015
Master of Liberal Arts Information Session (MLINFO)

Join us and meet the new Associate Dean of Liberal Arts, Fred Beuttler, and speak with Master of Liberal Arts students and alumni. Afterwards, David Wray, Associate Professor in the Department of Classics, the Department of Comparative Literature, and the College, will give a lecture entitled "Greek Thought on the Art of Living," so you can see firsthand the topics covered in the MLA curriculum.

Schedule

11-11:30 am: Meet and Greet with Fred Beuttler, Associate Dean of Liberal Arts, and MLA staff and students
11:30-11:45: Break
11:45 AM–12:30 PM: Lecture, Professor David Wray, “Greek Thought on the Art of Living”

Register

Gleacher Center
450 N Cityfront Plaza Dr
Chicago, IL 60611
Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
tbd
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15S2
Location:
Dates: June 20
Tuition: $0.00
Days/Times: Sat
11:00 AM–12:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:

Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

WSONWG 15U1 Online Writing Group Colleen O'Brien Spring 2015
Online Writing Group (WSONWG)

Want feedback on work-in-progress (fiction, creative nonfiction, or poetry) from an intimate community of writers? Join an online writing group, where you can participate in workshop discussions as your individual schedule permits via a secure website, rather than during preset class times. The instructor gives feedback and facilitates the online discussion of the manuscripts submitted, but does not assign readings, exercises, or other outside work. The focus is entirely on workshop discussion of student writing. Prior workshop experience is strongly recommended. For more information on how online writing groups work and how to register, visit grahamschool.uchicago.edu/writersstudio/group.

 

No class July 4.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Colleen O'Brien

Colleen O'Brien

Colleen O'Brien

has had her poetry and fiction appear in The Antioch Review, North American Review, West Branch, Denver Quarterly, and other journals. She has been nominated for a Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer's Award and has been a finalist for a Ruth Lilly Fellowship.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Online
Dates: June 22 to August 22
Tuition: $575.00
Days/Times:



Online Registration Close Date:
June 19, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

FLSCAR 15U1 Spoken Colloquial Arabic (Noncertificate) Cameron Cross Summer 2015
Spoken Colloquial Arabic (Noncertificate) (FLSCAR)

This yearlong series is an alternate or additional route for students who are already familiar with Modern Standard Arabic. The next step is to build the necessary vocabulary and expressions to hold a basic conversation in colloquial Egyptian Arabic. Focusing on corresponding patterns of morphology and verb conjugations, students will not read or write extensively, but rather they will have regular conversations, watch videos, and read comic strips in colloquial Arabic. This course is for students interested in acquiring basic conversational skills in everyday Egyptian Arabic.

No Class July 4.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Cameron Cross

Cameron Cross

Cameron Cross

holds master's degrees in Middle Eastern studies and Near Eastern languages and civilizations from the University of Chicago.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 22 to August 10
Tuition: $360.00
Days/Times: Mon
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 14, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUQUR 15U2 The Qur'an Adam Rose Summer 2015
The Qur'an (BPUQUR)

Considered the record of the revealed word of God to Muhammad through the angel Gabriel, the Qur’an is the third great scripture of the Semitic tradition and the foundation of all forms of Islam. We will read the Qur’an (as well as supplementary readings) to gain an initial understanding of the book, its perspectives on important concepts such as the nature of God and human, divine judgment, prophecy and history, the ideal society, the proper relationship between Muslims and non-Muslims, jihad (“holy war” or “exertion”), and more. No prior knowledge or experience of any kind is required.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Adam Rose

Adam Rose

Adam Rose

has taught in the Basic Program since 1993, and is a former Staff Chair of the program. He is primarily interested in the ways texts affect human life.

He is the 2007 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

24 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U2
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 22 to August 10
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Mon
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 21, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUSPD 15U1 Poetry and Selected Prose of John Donne Claudia Traudt Summer 2015
Poetry and Selected Prose of John Donne (BPUSPD)

John Donne, metaphysical poet, lawyer, and dean of St. Paul’s Cathedral, was a man of crashing intellect and passion. From the earthiness, anger, seduction, bravado, and humor of “Song,” “The Flea,” “The Sun Rising,” and “Elegy: To His Mistress Going to Bed” to the fiery abnegation and witness of “Good Friday: Riding Westward” (“Burn off my rusts and my deformity...”) and the Holy Sonnets, we have one man. In poems and select passages from Donne’s Sermons and Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, we will engage the shapeliness, force, exactitude, profundity, and pregnancy of his imagination, conceit–constructing wit, and expressive power.

For the first class, please read “Song” and “The Sun Rising.”

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

holds an MA from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her art-making, research, and teaching explore modes of creation and perception in word and image.

She is the 2006 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

24 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 22 to August 10
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Mon
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 21, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUTER 15U1 Heidegger's Nietzsche: The Eternal Return Clare Pearson Summer 2015
Heidegger's Nietzsche: The Eternal Return (BPUTER)

This class will be devoted to a close philosophical reading of Nietzsche’s concept of “the eternal return of the same,” looking at relevant selections from Nietzsche, and engaging in a close reading of Heidegger’s lecture course on the same topic: using Heidegger as a guide to Nietzsche, but also looking at how his critique of Nietzsche forms the basis for his own philosophical revolution. Books will include Volume II of Heidegger’s Nietzsche; Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke Zarathustra, and additional Nietzsche selections.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Clare Pearson

Clare Pearson

Clare Pearson

did graduate work with the University’s Committee on Social Thought, and pursues interdisciplinary work centering especially on ethical questions and experiences. She chaired the Basic Program from 2004-2008 and co-designed and chaired the Asian Classics Program from 2006-2009. Ms. Pearson received the 2013 Graham School Excellence in Teaching Award.

18 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 22 to July 27
Tuition: $260.00
Days/Times: Mon
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 21, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUQUR 15U1 The Qur'an Adam Rose Summer 2015
The Qur'an (BPUQUR)

Considered the record of the revealed word of God to Muhammad through the angel Gabriel, the Qur’an is the third great scripture of the Semitic tradition and the foundation of all forms of Islam. We will read the Qur’an (as well as supplementary readings) to gain an initial understanding of the book, its perspectives on important concepts such as the nature of God and human, divine judgment, prophecy and history, the ideal society, the proper relationship between Muslims and non-Muslims, jihad (“holy war” or “exertion”), and more. No prior knowledge or experience of any kind is required.

 

No class July 20.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Adam Rose

Adam Rose

Adam Rose

has taught in the Basic Program since 1993, and is a former Staff Chair of the program. He is primarily interested in the ways texts affect human life.

He is the 2007 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

24 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 22 to August 17
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Mon
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 21, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

FLSA4C 15U1 Spoken Colloquial Arabic (Certificate) Cameron Cross Summer 2015
Spoken Colloquial Arabic (Certificate) (FLSA4C)

This yearlong series is an alternate or additional route for students who are already familiar with Modern Standard Arabic. The next step is to build the necessary vocabulary and expressions to hold a basic conversation in colloquial Egyptian Arabic. Focusing on corresponding patterns of morphology and verb conjugations, students will not read or write extensively, but rather they will have regular conversations, watch videos, and read comic strips in colloquial Arabic. This course is for students interested in acquiring basic conversational skills in everyday Egyptian Arabic.

No meeting on July 4. Review on August 8, 1:30–4:00 PM; Exam Saturday, August 15, 10:00 AM–12:30 PM.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Cameron Cross

Cameron Cross

Cameron Cross

holds master's degrees in Middle Eastern studies and Near Eastern languages and civilizations from the University of Chicago.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 22 to August 24
Tuition: $560.00
Days/Times: Mon
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 18, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUMSS 15U1 Magical Short Stories Katia Mitova Summer 2015
Magical Short Stories (BPUMSS)

“As Gregor Samsa awoke one morning from uneasy dreams, he found himself transformed into a gigantic…” The merger of realism and fantasy delights the reader’s imagination but also causes “Kafkaesque” disquiet and prompts questions about consciousness and objectivity, as well as about the incentives, material, and insights of creativity. We will discuss stories by famous “magical realists” belonging to diverse literary traditions. Besides works by Latin American writers such as Cortázar, Carpentier, Fuentes, Borges, García Márquez, and Isabel Allende, we will consider stories by E.T.A. Hoffman, Gogol, Kafka, Bruno Schulz, Mikhail Bulgakov, Italo Calvino, Toni Morrison, and Donald Barthelme.

For our first class, please read “The Nose” by Gogol and “A Country Doctor” by Kafka.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Katia Mitova

Katia Mitova

Katia Mitova

has been teaching in the Basic Program since 1998. She holds an MA in Comparative Slavic Studies from the University of Sofia, Bulgaria, and an MA and PhD from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. In her native city, Sofia, she worked as an assistant professor of Slavic literatures, literary critic, the Editor of the national quarterly magazine for literature and political philosophy, Panorama, and daily correspondent for Radio Free Europe. Mitova has published two books of poetry,The Human Shell (1994), in Bulgarian, and Dream Diary (2013), in English. She has translated (into Bulgarian) and edited 15 books of fiction, poetry, and philosophy. She taught philosophy and literature in the College at the University of Chicago and at present is a professional faculty at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Katia Mitova is the 2008 recipient of Graham School’s Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

24 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 22 to August 10
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Mon
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 21, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

SMCAPP 15U1 Sustainability Capstone Project tbd Summer 2015
Sustainability Capstone Project (SMCAPP)

The final course in the program seeks to apply the liberal arts strategies and technical knowledge explored in the previous quarters in a “real world” scenario. Students will develop a model sustainability plan for a hypothetical entity, although they may also choose to draw upon the real problems facing their workplace. Case studies and test scenarios from program partner companies and organizations.

Prerequisite(s):

All LSM curricular courses must be completed; plus, capstone application submitted and approved.

Instructor:
tbd
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location:
Dates: June 23 to August 25
Tuition: $610.00
Days/Times: Tue
TBA



Online Registration Close Date:
June 22, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPYR01 15U1 CANCELED: Year 1 Autumn Curriculum: Summer Makeup... tbd Summer 2015
CANCELED: Year 1 Autumn Curriculum: Summer Makeup Course (BPYR01)

This course is for students who missed the Autumn Quarter and for current or past students who wish to revisit it. The curriculum explores the theme of virtue: what is it, who has it, and what happens when an individual’s sense of right and wrong clashes with that of society? The tutorial is devoted to Plato’s dialogue, the Meno, which explores what virtue is and how it is acquired. The seminar begins with Sophocles’s Antigone, which shows the clash between Creon’s decree punishing a traitor and Antigone’s determination to uphold the traitor’s humanity. This is followed by two Platonic dialogues, the Apology and the Crito, which relate the trial of Socrates, his death sentence, and his refusal to escape even though he has been wrongfully condemned. The final work is Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, which examines whether the claims of law and morality are absolute or whether rare individuals can live outside the law and beyond morality.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
tbd
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to August 25
Tuition: $415.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 16, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPURC3 15U1 Livy: Imperial Chronicler of Ancient Rome, Part 3 Zoë Eisenman Summer 2015
Livy: Imperial Chronicler of Ancient Rome, Part 3 (BPURC3)

The historian Livy wrote at the beginning of the Roman Empire, but preferred the ancient Republic as his subject. In this class we will continue our study of Livy’s History of Republican Rome, reading books 21 through 30. These books tell of the epic struggle between the two ancient superpowers, Rome and her rival Carthage, and how Hannibal’s invasion of Italy brought Rome to the brink of disaster. Livy’s account of these historical struggles also serves as a commentary on the contemporary events that he witnessed as Rome moved from Republic to Empire.

For the first class please read Book 21. 

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Zoë Eisenman

Zoë Eisenman

Zoë Eisenman

has a BA in Greek from Vassar College and a MA in classics from University of Chicago, where she has also done advanced graduate work. She has been an instructor in the Basic Program since 1992, has taught in the College at University of Chicago, and currently also teaches philosophy at St. Xavier University. Her main academic interest is the ancient world, and she focuses on Greek and Roman philosophy, Ancient history and literature. She also enjoys Shakespeare, Medieval literature and science fiction.

She is the 2014 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

340
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to August 11
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 22, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

LAMUSQ 15U1 Beethoven and Schubert: The Sonatas and Quartets John Gibbons Summer 2015
Beethoven and Schubert: The Sonatas and Quartets (LAMUSQ)

For Beethoven, the sonata was his laboratory or workshop. It was the genre in which he experimented with his most audacious and original ideas, while the quartet decisively marks the culmination of each of his “three periods.” Schubert’s sonatas and quartets express his utterly complementary character in regard to Beethoven. Works such as “Rosamunde,” “Death and the Maiden,” and the final valedictory sonata trilogy represent the charming Viennese lilt tinged with death that is perhaps Schubert’s most compelling characteristic.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
John Gibbons

John Gibbons

John Gibbons

Mr. Gibbons holds a PhD from the University of Chicago Department of Music. His works have been performed at the Rockefeller Music Competition and by the Minnesota Chamber Symphony. He received the 2005 Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies Excellence in Teaching Award for the Humanities, Arts, and Sciences.

Notes: No class on July 4th.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to August 11
Tuition: $360.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM–12:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 22, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUSWR 15U1 Shakespeare's War of the Roses Joseph Alulis Summer 2015
Shakespeare's War of the Roses (BPUSWR)

Near the end of the Tudor dynasty, Shakespeare dramatized its birth a century earlier. Henry VI and Richard III tell the related stories of the end of the Hundred Years’ War, the Wars of the Roses, and the rise and fall of Richard, Duke of Gloucester. In this account of the years 1422–85, Shakespeare shows the meaning of the subsequent Tudor age, 1485–1603, and anticipates the Stuart age to come, 1603–88, and the development of the English constitution. We will read these plays to both appreciate their drama and poetry, and their political insight.

Please read the first three acts of Henry VI, Part I for the first class.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Joseph Alulis

Joseph Alulis

Joseph Alulis

has a PhD in political science from the University of Chicago. He has published articles on Tocqueville, Lincoln, Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, and the film maker Whit Stillman, and is co-editor of two collections of scholarly essays,Tocqueville’s Defense of Human Freedom (1993) and Shakespeare’s Political Pageant (1996). His most recent publication is “’The Very Heart of Loss’: Love and Politics in Antony and Cleopatra” (2013). He has held appointments at three area colleges, Loyola University of Chicago, Lake Forest College, and North Park University where he is currently professor of politics and government and chair of the department. At North Park his teaching responsibilities include American foreign policy, international politics, and politics of the Middle East. Joe first taught for the Basic Program in 1982. His scholarly interests include political philosophy, American political thought, and the thought of Shakespeare, Tocqueville, Lincoln, Dostoevsky, and Saul Bellow.

18 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to July 28
Tuition: $260.00
Days/Times: Tue
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 22, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUTAJ 15U1 Two by Tom Stoppard: Travesties and Jumpers Claudia Traudt Summer 2015
Two by Tom Stoppard: Travesties and Jumpers (BPUTAJ)

Tom Stoppard’s 1974 Travesties and 1972 Jumpers are seriously madcap comedies and think-fests—each juicily provoking, and mind- and soul-haunting. Following on Remy Bumppo Theatre’s Spring 2015 run of Travesties, we will savor and examine its confluence of James Joyce, Tristan Tzara, and Lenin, avatars of Oscar Wilde’s folk in the addlepated Zurich 1917 memories of aging civil servant and Joyce nemesis Henry Carr. And, encountering the Incredible Radical Liberal Jumpers of the earlier work, we will confront the postures of academic philosophes, gymnastics mental and corporal, disillusion on earth and in the heavens; and a swinging bit of nakedness.

For the first class, please read in Travesties, Act One, through p. 23, Henry Carr's line: “...the Jesus Christ I'm out of it!— into the valley of the invalided—Carr of the Consulate!”

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

holds an MA from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her art-making, research, and teaching explore modes of creation and perception in word and image.

She is the 2006 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

24 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to August 11
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 22, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

WSEDYW 15U1 Editing Your Work Jennifer McDonald Summer 2015
Editing Your Work (WSEDYW)

Learn how an editor approaches manuscripts so you can bring these same insights and interventions to your own work. In this workshop for writers of fiction and nonfiction, we will practice techniques for reading and refining that will have you thinking and acting as your own editor. Reading aloud from works in progress, students will learn to be active listeners and constructive critics, listening for patterns, repetitions, musical passages, false notes. We will examine larger points—what is the work about? Are ideas expressed logically and clearly? Are questions left unexplored? Do characters ring true?—as well as finer ones, analyzing how changes made at the paragraph or sentence level can vastly improve one’s writing.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Jennifer McDonald

Jennifer McDonald

Jennifer McDonald

is an editor, writer, and critic based in Chicago. Previously, she was an editor at The New York Times Book Review. She has also been an editor on the national desk at The New York Times and an editor and writer for The Washington Post. In 2012-13, she was a fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University.

10 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to July 14
Tuition: $285.00
Days/Times: Tue
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 22, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUEGF 15U1 Eros in Gothic Fiction Marissa Love Summer 2015
Eros in Gothic Fiction (BPUEGF)

In Plato’s Symposium, Socrates describes the ascent from bodily eros to a love of higher things: beauty, wisdom, and virtue. The rest of the dialogue undercuts this high-mindedness as characters teeter between restraint and abandon. Two millennia after Plato, Gothic fiction revisits the tension between reason and desire. This course pairs Plato with novels by Austen and the Brontë sisters: Northanger Abbey, Wuthering Heights, and Jane Eyre. We will consider the nature of eros, whether it can be mediated, its risks and rewards, and its power to create and to destroy.

For the first class please read Volume 1 of Northanger Abbey, and the Symposium through the end of Phaedrus’s speech (180b).

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Marissa Love

Marissa Love

Marissa Love

has taught in the Basic Program since 1998.  Areas of interest include 19th century novels, Shakespeare, Japanese literature, lyric poetry, and the intersection of philosophy and fiction.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to August 11
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Tue
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 22, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUSPD 15U2 CANCELED: Poetry and Selected Prose of John Donne Claudia Traudt Summer 2015
CANCELED: Poetry and Selected Prose of John Donne (BPUSPD)

John Donne, metaphysical poet, lawyer, and dean of St. Paul’s Cathedral, was a man of crashing intellect and passion. From the earthiness, anger, seduction, bravado, and humor of “Song,” “The Flea,” “The Sun Rising,” and “Elegy: To His Mistress Going to Bed” to the fiery abnegation and witness of “Good Friday: Riding Westward” (“Burn off my rusts and my deformity...”) and the Holy Sonnets, we have one man. In poems and select passages from Donne’s Sermons and Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, we will engage the shapeliness, force, exactitude, profundity, and pregnancy of his imagination, conceit–constructing wit, and expressive power.

For the first class, please read “Song” and “The Sun Rising.”

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

holds an MA from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her art-making, research, and teaching explore modes of creation and perception in word and image.

She is the 2006 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

24 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U2
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to August 11
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Tue
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 19, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

LAHIBE 15U1 The British Empire in History and Literature Jim Lothian Summer 2015
The British Empire in History and Literature (LAHIBE)

The British Empire was the largest the world has known. At its greatest extent. Britain ruled over nearly a sixth of the world’s population and the empire covered nearly a quarter of the earth’s land mass. This course will treat the history of the empire from its origins in the 17th century to its dissolution in the 20th. Our primary focus will be on how the British people themselves understood the Empire. Readings will include the works of notable recent historians, as well as some of the most interesting literature produced out of the engagement with empire.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Jim Lothian

Jim Lothian

Jim Lothian

Mr. Lothian holds a PhD in history from the University of Chicago and has taught at Binghamton University. His studies include modern and early modern Britain and Ireland, British Empire, European intellectual history, and history of science.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to August 12
Tuition: $360.00
Days/Times: Wed
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 23, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

LAAHVG 15U1 CANCELED: Vincent Van Gogh Catherine Burdick Summer 2015
CANCELED: Vincent Van Gogh (LAAHVG)

Often portrayed as a misunderstood loner driven by mental illness and expressive genius, Van Gogh has had a seminal role in defining modern notions of artistic identity. This course will explore his correspondence, his personal history and cultural milieu, and the history of 19th-century modernist painting in order to better understand Van Gogh’s extraordinary paintings.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Catherine Burdick
10 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to July 15
Tuition: $180.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–12:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 5, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

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