Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics

Jonathan C. Silverstein, MD, MS, FACS, FACMI

Dr. Jonathan C. Silverstein Tracks Progress towards Achieving a Learning Health System for MScBMI’s January Seminar

Speaker pointing to projection screen

Cheng-Kai Kao, MD, Speaks on Healthcare Innovation and Entrepreneurship

The talk focused primarily on healthcare’s employment of information technology to improve efficiency and workflow management in hospitals. Read more >

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Fall 2017 Deadline
June 1, 2017 (Early decision/International Deadline)
June 30, 2017 (Regular Deadline)

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Why UChicago?

The University’s expertise in genomic research, translational medicine, and computation combines to give MScBMI an ideal home.

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Over the past thirty years, biomedical informatics has emerged as an independent rigorous discipline. Due to the rapid growth of clinical information systems, networked healthcare platforms, high-throughput genomic technologies, and consumer and public health informatics, the demand for knowledgeable and experienced staff and faculty has far outpaced the number of available trainees.

Students who earn the University of Chicago Graham School Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics degree will be prepared with the necessary knowledge and technical skills to tackle everyday management issues and to guide large informatics projects in clinical and research settings.

Continuing in the Graham School’s tradition of academic excellence and transformative professional education, the Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics program has been developed in collaboration with the University Of Chicago Pritzker School Of Medicine. Faculty from the Computation Institute, Department of Computer Science, and Department of Public Health Sciences also provide programmatic oversight. An active Industry Advisory Group also ensures the program content is relevant to industry needs and aids students with networking and identifying career opportunities.

Students completing the Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics degree will be prepared with the necessary knowledge and technical skills to tackle everyday management issues and to guide large projects in clinical and research settings. The program is designed for working adults with the option to pace the coursework to suit your schedule. The program launched in March 2016 and currently has approximately fifty students enrolled. The courses meet in person to provide students with direct access to interactive instruction and team-based learning.

Biomedical Informatics Program Highlights

The Graham School’s close ties with biomedical and technology industry leaders give students access to data on current issues and offer networking opportunities. The real-world, hands-on exposure gained through coursework and the capstone project prepares students to implement informatics solutions confidently and apply their skills to important challenges in the field. Key features of the Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics program include:

  • High quality, in-person training
  • Small class size with individual attention
  • Development of critical skills and practical knowledge for success
  • Instruction from University of Chicago faculty and industry professionals

All students initially follow a core curriculum in biomedical informatics and then focus on areas of specializations through the selection of electives. Core biomedical informatics courses include:

  • Introduction to Biomedical Informatics
  • Concepts in Computer Programming
  • Applied Research/Clinical Informatics
  • Ethics and Policy Questions: Genomics, Healthcare and Big Data
  • Leadership and Management for Informaticians

Help Advance the Industry, and Your Career

In an era of vast technological advancement, we know our society can do better. With a Master of Science in Biomedical Informatics degree from the Graham School, you will develop the skills necessary to become a leader in this field and to create pathways that connect clinicians and patients to data.

It is our belief that closing this data gap in healthcare presents the single greatest opportunity for medicine in the first half of this century. By putting information in the hands of the people who need it most, we can save countless lives and continue to advance healthcare into the digital age.