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Alumni Courses

For students who have completed at least two years of the Basic Program, we offer single alumni courses as well Alumni Sequences.

Alumni Sequences are two-year, curated courses of study that center on a specific era or culture while incorporating a mixture of texts from the larger Western tradition, continuing to deepen the conversation begun in the regular curriculum. Students take one class per quarter in order, providing the same cohort experience as in the 1-4 year Basic Program curriculum.

Click a course title to read the course description and register for the course.

Courses

Basic Program (Alumni) Ovid Metamorphoses
03/27/2017 to 06/12/2017

BASC 50013 | Ovid Metamorphoses

Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BC to AD 17 or 18) began his epic poem on the theme of changes about AD 2, and finished it in exile. The poem has pleased and informed Western readers and poets since its first appearance. Ovid’s retelling and modification of the myths of ancient Greece and Rome was read through the Middle Ages and the Renaissance as a collection of stories, and, from the 16th Century, began to be appreciated as a source of innovative poetic principles. It has been said that “The Metamorphoses is like no poem written before it, although virtually everything in it can be found elsewhere.” (This is the third quarter of a three-quarter sequence).

No class Apr 10, May 29.

Prerequisite(s):

Alumni courses and sequences are open to students who have completed through two years of the Basic Program.

Instructor:
Keith Cleveland

Keith Cleveland

Keith Cleveland

Mr. Cleveland holds advanced degrees in philosophy and law from the University of Chicago.  He began teaching the Basic Program in 1968, and has taught many alumni courses on Plato, Aristotle, political philosophy, the sciences, literature, and much else. He is the 2009 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

30 PD/CPDU
Course Code: BASC 50013
Section: 17S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates:
Mar 27 to Jun 12
Tuition: $430.00
Days/Times: Mon
6:30 PM–9:45 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 24, 2017
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

Basic Program (Alumni) CANCELED: Steinbeck: Tortilla Flat, The Log from the Sea of Cortez and The Long Valley
03/27/2017 to 06/12/2017

BASC 50063 | CANCELED: Steinbeck: Tortilla Flat, The Log from the Sea of Cortez and The Long Valley

John Steinbeck’s incarnating the life of the Salinas Valley, the particularities around Monterey, California and the Pacific thrillingly draws from geologic pre-history, the external and inner movements of people, the uses and abuses of those lands and waters, those people, their works, their Beings and Becomings. Tortilla Flat’s raucous, picaresque vignettes paint an almost religious saga of post-war paisanos fighting, drinking, loving, dying, surviving - chapter by piquant chapter. Famously, The Log crystallizes narrative from Steinbeck’s healing and passional marine study voyage with beloved biologist-friend Ed Ricketts, model for Doc of Cannery Row. The Long Valley’s short stories are Steinbeck’s garland, litany, hymn to his Salinas.

No class Apr 10, May 29.

Prerequisite(s):

Alumni courses and sequences are open to students who have completed through two years of the Basic Program.

Instructor:
Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

Ms. Traudt holds an MA from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her art-making, research, and teaching explore modes of creation and perception in word and image. She is the 2006 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

30 PD/CPDU
Course Code: BASC 50063
Section: 17S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates:
Mar 27 to Jun 12
Tuition: $430.00
Days/Times: Mon
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 22, 2017
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

Basic Program (Alumni) Torah: The Book of Numbers and Deuteronomy
03/28/2017 to 06/6/2017

BASC 50043 | Torah: The Book of Numbers and Deuteronomy

The Book of Numbers narrates the final leg of the Exodus from Egypt, beginning at Mt. Sinai where Moses received the revelation of the Torah and ending at Mt. Pisgah, near the fords of the Jordan River that allow crossing into the Promised Land. The book of Deuteronomy, as the Greek form of the name suggests, is a second recitation of the stipulations revealed to Moses at Mt. Sinai. This second giving of the Law, however, comes in the form of Moses’s final testament to the children of Israel before he dies. Like the testament of Jacob at the end of the Book of Genesis, this Testament of Moses looks back in order to look ahead. These final words of Moses in Deuteronomy anticipate the role of the prophets in the subsequent books of the Bible.

No class Apr 11.

Prerequisite(s):

Alumni courses and sequences are open to students who have completed through two years of the Basic Program.

Instructor:
Stephen Hall

Stephen Hall

Stephen Hall

Mr. Hall holds an MA in Hebrew Language Studies from the American Institute in Jerusalem, a ThM in Old Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and is working on a PhD at the Divinity School of the University of Chicago.

30 PD/CPDU
Course Code: BASC 50043
Section: 17S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates:
Mar 28 to Jun 06
Tuition: $430.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Unlimited slots available

Online Registration Close Date:
March 27, 2017
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

Basic Program (Alumni) Alumni Sequence: The Romans II
03/28/2017 to 06/7/2017

BASC 61213 | Alumni Sequence: The Romans II

Spring concludes the sequence with an exploration of Stoic philosophy, which developed in Rome as a way to reflect on and deal with the difficulties of a world some thought was spinning out of control. The tutorial focuses on the principle Roman Stoic authors that survive, a group from the early empire that includes a millionaire, an ex-slave, and an emperor. Writing from disparate perspectives and with different styles, these authors present us with a surprisingly consistent depiction of Stoic ideas and methods. In the Seminar, we will read a selection of more modern authors who are influenced by Roman Stoic thought in a variety of ways.

No class April 11.

Week Seminar
1–4 Montesquieu Consideration on the Causes for the Greatness of the Romans and Their Decline
5–7 Voltaire Candide
8–10 Vonnegut Slaughterhouse Five

  

Week Tutorial
1 Seneca “On Providence”
2 Seneca “Consolation to Marcia”
3-5 Seneca, Selected Letters
6-7 Epictetus The Handbook
8-10 Marcus Aurelius Meditations
Prerequisite(s):

The Romans I, II Autumn and Winter

Alumni courses and sequences are open to students who have completed through two years of the Basic Program.

Instructor:
Zoë Eisenman, Adam Rose

Zoë Eisenman

Zoë Eisenman

Ms. Eisenman is the current Chair of the Basic Program of Liberal Education for Adults. She holds an MA in Classics from University of Chicago. Her main academic focus is on Greek and Roman philosophy, Classical cultural history and gender studies.

,

Adam Rose

Adam Rose

Mr. Rose has taught in the Basic Program since 1993, and is a former Staff Chair of the program. He is primarily interested in the ways texts affect human life. He is the recipient of the 2007 Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies Excellence in Teaching Award.

30 PD/CPDU
Course Code: BASC 61213
Section: 17S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates:
Mar 28 to Jun 07
Tuition: $430.00
Days/Times: Tue
2:00 PM–5:15 PM



Unlimited slots available

Online Registration Close Date:
March 27, 2017
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BASC 61213 | Alumni Sequence: The Romans II

Spring concludes the sequence with an exploration of Stoic philosophy, which developed in Rome as a way to reflect on and deal with the difficulties of a world some thought was spinning out of control. The tutorial focuses on the principle Roman Stoic authors that survive, a group from the early empire that includes a millionaire, an ex-slave, and an emperor. Writing from disparate perspectives and with different styles, these authors present us with a surprisingly consistent depiction of Stoic ideas and methods. In the Seminar, we will read a selection of more modern authors who are influenced by Roman Stoic thought in a variety of ways.

No class April 11.

Week Seminar
1–4 Montesquieu Consideration on the Causes for the Greatness of the Romans and Their Decline
5–7 Voltaire Candide
8–10 Vonnegut Slaughterhouse Five

  

Week Tutorial
1 Seneca “On Providence”
2 Seneca “Consolation to Marcia”
3-5 Seneca, Selected Letters
6-7 Epictetus The Handbook
8-10 Marcus Aurelius Meditations
Prerequisite(s):

The Romans I, II Autumn and Winter

Alumni courses and sequences are open to students who have completed through two years of the Basic Program.

Instructor:
Zoë Eisenman, Adam Rose

Zoë Eisenman

Zoë Eisenman

Ms. Eisenman is the current Chair of the Basic Program of Liberal Education for Adults. She holds an MA in Classics from University of Chicago. Her main academic focus is on Greek and Roman philosophy, Classical cultural history and gender studies.

,

Adam Rose

Adam Rose

Mr. Rose has taught in the Basic Program since 1993, and is a former Staff Chair of the program. He is primarily interested in the ways texts affect human life. He is the recipient of the 2007 Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies Excellence in Teaching Award.

30 PD/CPDU
Course Code: BASC 61213
Section: 17S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates:
Mar 28 to Jun 07
Tuition: $430.00
Days/Times: Tue
2:00 PM–5:15 PM



Unlimited slots available

Online Registration Close Date:
March 27, 2017
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

Basic Program (Alumni) Alumni Sequence: The Modern Tradition I
03/28/2017 to 05/30/2017

BASC 62113 | Alumni Sequence: The Modern Tradition I

This quarter’s seminar examines the legacies of slavery and racism in America through three classic testaments to the experience of social and political persecution and oppression and to the African-American struggle not just for rights and recognition but, more foundationally, for sense, self-understanding, and essential dignity. A contrasting text, by Spanish philosopher and social theorist Ortega y Gasset, describes a very different but parallel form of social polarization—”noble” and “mass”—and the potentially dehumanizing effects of the modern movement toward an inclusive, hyper-democratic, and “de-moralized” society. The tutorial takes up some of the most important poetry of the 19th and 20th centuries, reflecting on the ways in which modern innovations in poetic forms and practices have shaped modern sensibilities, experiences, judgments, and even the character of modern realities. Poems will be selected by the instructor in consultation with students.

Week Seminar
1–2 DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk
3–4 Ortega y Gasset, The Revolt of the Masses
5–8 Ellison, The Invisible Man
9–10 Faulkner, “The Bear”

  

Week Tutorial
1-10 Modern poetry

 

Prerequisite(s):

Alumni courses and sequences are open to students who have completed through two years of the Basic Program.

Instructor:
Lindsay Atnip, Adam Rose

Lindsay Atnip

Lindsay Atnip

Lindsay Atnip holds a BA in Economics and an MA in Political Philosophy from the University of Chicago. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in the University's Committee on Social Thought, focusing on 20th century American literature and theories of literary criticism, with an abiding background interest in the critique of modernity.

,

Adam Rose

Adam Rose

Mr. Rose has taught in the Basic Program since 1993, and is a former Staff Chair of the program. He is primarily interested in the ways texts affect human life. He is the recipient of the 2007 Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies Excellence in Teaching Award.

30 PD/CPDU
Course Code: BASC 62113
Section: 17S2
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates:
Mar 28 to May 30
Tuition: $430.00
Days/Times: Tue
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Unlimited slots available

Online Registration Close Date:
March 27, 2017
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BASC 62113 | Alumni Sequence: The Modern Tradition I

This quarter’s seminar examines the legacies of slavery and racism in America through three classic testaments to the experience of social and political persecution and oppression and to the African-American struggle not just for rights and recognition but, more foundationally, for sense, self-understanding, and essential dignity. A contrasting text, by Spanish philosopher and social theorist Ortega y Gasset, describes a very different but parallel form of social polarization—”noble” and “mass”—and the potentially dehumanizing effects of the modern movement toward an inclusive, hyper-democratic, and “de-moralized” society. The tutorial takes up some of the most important poetry of the 19th and 20th centuries, reflecting on the ways in which modern innovations in poetic forms and practices have shaped modern sensibilities, experiences, judgments, and even the character of modern realities. Poems will be selected by the instructor in consultation with students.

Week Seminar
1–2 DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk
3–4 Ortega y Gasset, The Revolt of the Masses
5–8 Ellison, The Invisible Man
9–10 Faulkner, “The Bear”

  

Week Tutorial
1-10 Modern poetry

 

Prerequisite(s):

Alumni courses and sequences are open to students who have completed through two years of the Basic Program.

Instructor:
Lindsay Atnip, Adam Rose

Lindsay Atnip

Lindsay Atnip

Lindsay Atnip holds a BA in Economics and an MA in Political Philosophy from the University of Chicago. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in the University's Committee on Social Thought, focusing on 20th century American literature and theories of literary criticism, with an abiding background interest in the critique of modernity.

,

Adam Rose

Adam Rose

Mr. Rose has taught in the Basic Program since 1993, and is a former Staff Chair of the program. He is primarily interested in the ways texts affect human life. He is the recipient of the 2007 Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies Excellence in Teaching Award.

30 PD/CPDU
Course Code: BASC 62113
Section: 17S2
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates:
Mar 28 to May 30
Tuition: $430.00
Days/Times: Tue
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Unlimited slots available

Online Registration Close Date:
March 27, 2017
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

Basic Program (Alumni) Alumni Sequence: The Modern Tradition I
03/29/2017 to 05/31/2017

BASC 62113 | Alumni Sequence: The Modern Tradition I

This quarter’s seminar examines the legacies of slavery and racism in America through three classic testaments to the experience of social and political persecution and oppression and to the African-American struggle not just for rights and recognition but, more foundationally, for sense, self-understanding, and essential dignity. A contrasting text, by Spanish philosopher and social theorist Ortega y Gasset, describes a very different but parallel form of social polarization—”noble” and “mass”—and the potentially dehumanizing effects of the modern movement toward an inclusive, hyper-democratic, and “de-moralized” society. The tutorial takes up some of the most important poetry of the 19th and 20th centuries, reflecting on the ways in which modern innovations in poetic forms and practices have shaped modern sensibilities, experiences, judgments, and even the character of modern realities. Poems will be selected by the instructor in consultation with students.

Week Seminar
1–2 DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk
3–4 Ortega y Gasset, The Revolt of the Masses
5–8 Ellison, The Invisible Man
9–10 Faulkner, “The Bear”

  

Week Tutorial
1-10 Modern poetry

 

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Lindsay Atnip, Adam Rose

Lindsay Atnip

Lindsay Atnip

Lindsay Atnip holds a BA in Economics and an MA in Political Philosophy from the University of Chicago. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in the University's Committee on Social Thought, focusing on 20th century American literature and theories of literary criticism, with an abiding background interest in the critique of modernity.

,

Adam Rose

Adam Rose

Mr. Rose has taught in the Basic Program since 1993, and is a former Staff Chair of the program. He is primarily interested in the ways texts affect human life. He is the recipient of the 2007 Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies Excellence in Teaching Award.

30 PD/CPDU
Course Code: BASC 62113
Section: 17S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates:
Mar 29 to May 31
Tuition: $430.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Unlimited slots available

Online Registration Close Date:
March 28, 2017
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BASC 62113 | Alumni Sequence: The Modern Tradition I

This quarter’s seminar examines the legacies of slavery and racism in America through three classic testaments to the experience of social and political persecution and oppression and to the African-American struggle not just for rights and recognition but, more foundationally, for sense, self-understanding, and essential dignity. A contrasting text, by Spanish philosopher and social theorist Ortega y Gasset, describes a very different but parallel form of social polarization—”noble” and “mass”—and the potentially dehumanizing effects of the modern movement toward an inclusive, hyper-democratic, and “de-moralized” society. The tutorial takes up some of the most important poetry of the 19th and 20th centuries, reflecting on the ways in which modern innovations in poetic forms and practices have shaped modern sensibilities, experiences, judgments, and even the character of modern realities. Poems will be selected by the instructor in consultation with students.

Week Seminar
1–2 DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk
3–4 Ortega y Gasset, The Revolt of the Masses
5–8 Ellison, The Invisible Man
9–10 Faulkner, “The Bear”

  

Week Tutorial
1-10 Modern poetry

 

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Lindsay Atnip, Adam Rose

Lindsay Atnip

Lindsay Atnip

Lindsay Atnip holds a BA in Economics and an MA in Political Philosophy from the University of Chicago. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in the University's Committee on Social Thought, focusing on 20th century American literature and theories of literary criticism, with an abiding background interest in the critique of modernity.

,

Adam Rose

Adam Rose

Mr. Rose has taught in the Basic Program since 1993, and is a former Staff Chair of the program. He is primarily interested in the ways texts affect human life. He is the recipient of the 2007 Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies Excellence in Teaching Award.

30 PD/CPDU
Course Code: BASC 62113
Section: 17S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates:
Mar 29 to May 31
Tuition: $430.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Unlimited slots available

Online Registration Close Date:
March 28, 2017
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BASC 62113 | Alumni Sequence: The Modern Tradition I

This quarter’s seminar examines the legacies of slavery and racism in America through three classic testaments to the experience of social and political persecution and oppression and to the African-American struggle not just for rights and recognition but, more foundationally, for sense, self-understanding, and essential dignity. A contrasting text, by Spanish philosopher and social theorist Ortega y Gasset, describes a very different but parallel form of social polarization—”noble” and “mass”—and the potentially dehumanizing effects of the modern movement toward an inclusive, hyper-democratic, and “de-moralized” society. The tutorial takes up some of the most important poetry of the 19th and 20th centuries, reflecting on the ways in which modern innovations in poetic forms and practices have shaped modern sensibilities, experiences, judgments, and even the character of modern realities. Poems will be selected by the instructor in consultation with students.

Week Seminar
1–2 DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk
3–4 Ortega y Gasset, The Revolt of the Masses
5–8 Ellison, The Invisible Man
9–10 Faulkner, “The Bear”

  

Week Tutorial
1-10 Modern poetry

 

Prerequisite(s):

Alumni courses and sequences are open to students who have completed through two years of the Basic Program.

Instructor:
Lindsay Atnip, Adam Rose

Lindsay Atnip

Lindsay Atnip

Lindsay Atnip holds a BA in Economics and an MA in Political Philosophy from the University of Chicago. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in the University's Committee on Social Thought, focusing on 20th century American literature and theories of literary criticism, with an abiding background interest in the critique of modernity.

,

Adam Rose

Adam Rose

Mr. Rose has taught in the Basic Program since 1993, and is a former Staff Chair of the program. He is primarily interested in the ways texts affect human life. He is the recipient of the 2007 Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies Excellence in Teaching Award.

30 PD/CPDU
Course Code: BASC 62113
Section: 17S3
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates:
Mar 29 to May 31
Tuition: $430.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Unlimited slots available

Online Registration Close Date:
March 28, 2017
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BASC 62113 | Alumni Sequence: The Modern Tradition I

This quarter’s seminar examines the legacies of slavery and racism in America through three classic testaments to the experience of social and political persecution and oppression and to the African-American struggle not just for rights and recognition but, more foundationally, for sense, self-understanding, and essential dignity. A contrasting text, by Spanish philosopher and social theorist Ortega y Gasset, describes a very different but parallel form of social polarization—”noble” and “mass”—and the potentially dehumanizing effects of the modern movement toward an inclusive, hyper-democratic, and “de-moralized” society. The tutorial takes up some of the most important poetry of the 19th and 20th centuries, reflecting on the ways in which modern innovations in poetic forms and practices have shaped modern sensibilities, experiences, judgments, and even the character of modern realities. Poems will be selected by the instructor in consultation with students.

Week Seminar
1–2 DuBois, The Souls of Black Folk
3–4 Ortega y Gasset, The Revolt of the Masses
5–8 Ellison, The Invisible Man
9–10 Faulkner, “The Bear”

  

Week Tutorial
1-10 Modern poetry

 

Prerequisite(s):

Alumni courses and sequences are open to students who have completed through two years of the Basic Program.

Instructor:
Lindsay Atnip, Adam Rose

Lindsay Atnip

Lindsay Atnip

Lindsay Atnip holds a BA in Economics and an MA in Political Philosophy from the University of Chicago. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in the University's Committee on Social Thought, focusing on 20th century American literature and theories of literary criticism, with an abiding background interest in the critique of modernity.

,

Adam Rose

Adam Rose

Mr. Rose has taught in the Basic Program since 1993, and is a former Staff Chair of the program. He is primarily interested in the ways texts affect human life. He is the recipient of the 2007 Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies Excellence in Teaching Award.

30 PD/CPDU
Course Code: BASC 62113
Section: 17S3
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates:
Mar 29 to May 31
Tuition: $430.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Unlimited slots available

Online Registration Close Date:
March 28, 2017
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

Basic Program (Alumni) Torah: The Book of Numbers and Deuteronomy
03/30/2017 to 06/1/2017

BASC 50043 | Torah: The Book of Numbers and Deuteronomy

The Book of Numbers narrates the final leg of the Exodus from Egypt, beginning at Mt. Sinai where Moses received the revelation of the Torah and ending at Mt. Pisgah, near the fords of the Jordan River that allow crossing into the Promised Land. The book of Deuteronomy, as the Greek form of the name suggests, is a second recitation of the stipulations revealed to Moses at Mt. Sinai. This second giving of the Law, however, comes in the form of Moses’s final testament to the children of Israel before he dies. Like the testament of Jacob at the end of the Book of Genesis, this Testament of Moses looks back in order to look ahead. These final words of Moses in Deuteronomy anticipate the role of the prophets in the subsequent books of the Bible.

Prerequisite(s):

Alumni courses and sequences are open to students who have completed through two years of the Basic Program.

Instructor:
Stephen Hall

Stephen Hall

Stephen Hall

Mr. Hall holds an MA in Hebrew Language Studies from the American Institute in Jerusalem, a ThM in Old Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and is working on a PhD at the Divinity School of the University of Chicago.

30 PD/CPDU
Course Code: BASC 50043
Section: 17S2
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates:
Mar 30 to Jun 01
Tuition: $430.00
Days/Times: Thu
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Unlimited slots available

Online Registration Close Date:
March 29, 2017
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

Basic Program (Alumni) Alumni Sequence: The Romans II
03/30/2017 to 06/1/2017

BASC 61213 | Alumni Sequence: The Romans II

Spring concludes the sequence with an exploration of Stoic philosophy, which developed in Rome as a way to reflect on and deal with the difficulties of a world some thought was spinning out of control. The tutorial focuses on the principle Roman Stoic authors that survive, a group from the early empire that includes a millionaire, an ex-slave, and an emperor. Writing from disparate perspectives and with different styles, these authors present us with a surprisingly consistent depiction of Stoic ideas and methods. In the Seminar, we will read a selection of more modern authors who are influenced by Roman Stoic thought in a variety of ways.

Week Seminar
1–4 Montesquieu Consideration on the Causes for the Greatness of the Romans and Their Decline
5–7 Voltaire Candide
8–10 Vonnegut Slaughterhouse Five

  

Week Tutorial
1 Seneca “On Providence”
2 Seneca “Consolation to Marcia”
3-5 Seneca, Selected Letters
6-7 Epictetus The Handbook
8-10 Marcus Aurelius Meditations
Prerequisite(s):

The Romans I, II Autumn and Winter

Alumni courses and sequences are open to students who have completed through two years of the Basic Program.

Instructor:
Joshua Daniel, Adam Rose

Joshua Daniel

Joshua Daniel

Joshua Daniel graduated from the University of Chicago Divinity School in 2013. Since then he has taught religious studies and philosophy courses at various Chicago-area colleges and universities. His area of scholarly interest is philosophical and religious ethics.

,

Adam Rose

Adam Rose

Mr. Rose has taught in the Basic Program since 1993, and is a former Staff Chair of the program. He is primarily interested in the ways texts affect human life. He is the recipient of the 2007 Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies Excellence in Teaching Award.

30 PD/CPDU
Course Code: BASC 61213
Section: 17S2
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates:
Mar 30 to Jun 01
Tuition: $430.00
Days/Times: Thu
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Unlimited slots available

Online Registration Close Date:
March 29, 2017
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BASC 61213 | Alumni Sequence: The Romans II

Spring concludes the sequence with an exploration of Stoic philosophy, which developed in Rome as a way to reflect on and deal with the difficulties of a world some thought was spinning out of control. The tutorial focuses on the principle Roman Stoic authors that survive, a group from the early empire that includes a millionaire, an ex-slave, and an emperor. Writing from disparate perspectives and with different styles, these authors present us with a surprisingly consistent depiction of Stoic ideas and methods. In the Seminar, we will read a selection of more modern authors who are influenced by Roman Stoic thought in a variety of ways.

Week Seminar
1–4 Montesquieu Consideration on the Causes for the Greatness of the Romans and Their Decline
5–7 Voltaire Candide
8–10 Vonnegut Slaughterhouse Five

  

Week Tutorial
1 Seneca “On Providence”
2 Seneca “Consolation to Marcia”
3-5 Seneca, Selected Letters
6-7 Epictetus The Handbook
8-10 Marcus Aurelius Meditations
Prerequisite(s):

The Romans I, II Autumn and Winter

Alumni courses and sequences are open to students who have completed through two years of the Basic Program.

Instructor:
Joshua Daniel, Adam Rose

Joshua Daniel

Joshua Daniel

Joshua Daniel graduated from the University of Chicago Divinity School in 2013. Since then he has taught religious studies and philosophy courses at various Chicago-area colleges and universities. His area of scholarly interest is philosophical and religious ethics.

,

Adam Rose

Adam Rose

Mr. Rose has taught in the Basic Program since 1993, and is a former Staff Chair of the program. He is primarily interested in the ways texts affect human life. He is the recipient of the 2007 Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies Excellence in Teaching Award.

30 PD/CPDU
Course Code: BASC 61213
Section: 17S2
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates:
Mar 30 to Jun 01
Tuition: $430.00
Days/Times: Thu
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Unlimited slots available

Online Registration Close Date:
March 29, 2017
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.