Winter Courses @ Graham

Join us this Winter for noncredit liberal arts courses in art, literature, history, politics, religion, the classics, and more.

The Gargoyle course catalogue offers an overview of all of Graham School's courses for the Autumn and Winter quarters.

A photo of an adult learner participating in an online course.

Courses for New Learners @ Graham

Here are five courses that we recommend as perfect entry points for learners who are new to Graham.

Winter 22W1
Jan 04—Feb 22
Tuesdays from 6:00—08:30 pm

In this course we will look at 2008 stock market crash as an event within literary fiction among writers in the US, the UK, and South Asia.

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Winter 22W1
Jan 08—Feb 26
Saturdays from 10:30 am—1:00 pm

"The makers of Middle Eastern Christianities were both saints and sinners. We explore their dialectical relationship through texts from the Middle East, the Roman and Iranian empires, as well as the kingdoms of the Caucasus, Central Asia, and Ethiopia."

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Winter 22W1
Jan 05—Feb 23
Tuesdays from 6:00—08:30 pm

In this course, we will examine the long history of curiosity, collaboration, and cultural exchange connecting Americans and Fascists. In light of this history, it would seem the pressing question is not "Can it happen here?" but rather: what was happening here? Or rather: when did America stop being a Fascist nation?

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Winter 22W1
Jan 05—Feb 23
Thursdays from 10:00 am—12:30 pm

Topics in this course include an assessment of the works and influence of William Byrd, Thomas Tallis and Henry Purcell, Elgar and the English orchestral tradition, Vaughan Williams and the idea of an English national style, and late and post romantic figures such as Holst and Delius, Britten, Bax, and Walton. Also included is a look at northern composers such as Grieg in works that topically overlap with the English tradition.

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Winter 22W1
Feb 26
Saturday from 10:00 am—4:00 pm

Nicholas Black Elk stands behind the great spiritual and religious classic, Black Elk Speaks, written by John Neihardt. The book has inspired and enkindled love and fascination with the religious tradition and perspectives of the Lakota people as they experienced the calamities surrounding the so-called Great Sioux War. Black Elk recounts his first-hand memories and experiences as a medicine man through these battles, victories, losses, hopes, and tragedies. This course will introduce the study of indigenous religious traditions, read and discuss Black Elk Speaks, and discuss interpretations of the questions the book poses to us.

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Courses for Experienced Learners @ Graham

Here are five courses we recommend for alums who are continuing their learning journey at Graham.

Winter 22W1
Jan 03–Mar 14
Mondays from 6—9:15 pm

Winter 22W2
Jan 06–Mar 10
Thursdays from 6—9:15 pm

Don Quixote is the first modern novel and many consider it the greatest. We will investigate what all the fuss is about, through close reading and discussion of big, important questions.

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Winter 22W1
Jan 06–Mar 10
Thursdays from 9:30 am—12:45 pm

We will study Song of Solomon (1977) and Beloved (1987) – arguably the most representative novels of Morrison's dramatic, imaginative, and empathic literary style.

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Winter 22W1
Jan 06–Mar 10
Thursdays from 6—9:15 pm

In this course, we will read closely the Prince and several of Machiavelli's literary works: both plays (Mandragola, Clizia), two of his four stories (Life of Castruccio, Belfagor), and poems, including his answer to Dante's Commedia called The Ass.

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Winter 22W1
Jan 08–Mar 12
Saturdays from 9:30 am—12:45 pm

In this course, we will read Salman Rushdie's modern classic, Midnight's Children. This novel won not only the Booker Prize in 1981, but the retrospective Best of the Booker (2008).

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Winter 22W1
Jan 08–Mar 12
Saturdays from 9:30 am—12:45 pm

It was the war that could not be written, said Whitman, and yet he and others wrote it—obsessively, profoundly, inconsolably. We will read poetry of Whitman and Melville and fiction of Bierce and Crane, along with some short critical writings.

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Instructors