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CodeSection Title Instructor Quarter/Dates
Financial Accounting (FNFACC)

This required course teaches you the terminology, tools, and techniques of financial accounting and shows you the relationships among major types of financial statements: balance sheets, cash flow statements, and income and expense statements. You learn how these statements are prepared, what information you can learn from them, how they treat the most common kinds of assets and liabilities, and how they report revenues, expenses, and cash flows according to generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). Financial reporting requirements for various kinds of firms are discussed. It is important in this course to stay up-to-date with readings and homework assignments every week.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
John Twombly

John Twombly

John Twombly, Ph.D., M.B.A., C.P.A.

Mr. Twombly holds M.B.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and he is a Certified Public Accountant.  He has taught accounting and finance at Northwestern University and the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School.

Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14W2
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 11 to May 6
Tuition: $1,325.00
Days/Times: Tue
6:00 PM - 9:00 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 10, 2014

Corporate Finance (FNBCFI)

This required course teaches principles and practices in corporate finance, with a particular emphasis on evaluating levels of risk and rates of return on corporate investments and resource allocations. Topics in the course include risk/reward assessment, the time value of money, interest rates, discounted cash flow analysis, rates of return, the capital asset pricing model, sources of funding, capital structure of a firm, stock insurance and buy-backs, dividend policy, and cash management.

Prerequisite(s):

Financial Accounting

Instructor:
Kamyar Jabbari

Kamyar Jabbari

Kamyar Jabbari

Mr. Jabbari, currently a personal financial and retirement adviser, enjoyed a long tenure as senior banker and vice president at the First National Bank of Chicago (now part of J.P. Morgan Chase), where his focus was energy and utility financing. For many years, he served as Clinical Assistant Professor of Finance at IIT Stuart School of Business.  Mr. Jabbari earned an M.B.A. at the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and a J.D. at the IIT Chicago Kent College of Law.

Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14W2
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 12 to April 30
Tuition: $1,325.00
Days/Times: Wed
6:00 PM - 9:00 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 11, 2014

Managerial Analysis: Tools for Better Decisions (FNMANA)

Financial accounting looks back at past financial performance and generates statements meant especially for a company’s external stakeholders, such as investors, lenders, and government regulators. Managerial analysis looks forward and serves decision makers inside the company.  This elective course shows you an array of practical, flexible, optional tools to analyze financial and other information so you can manage and reduce costs, increase operational efficiency, identify profit maximizing production and service volumes, improve internal controls, and develop performance metrics for critical business processes and operations.  Department managers, financial managers, budget analysts, managerial accountants, and entrepreneurs will find the course valuable.  

Prerequisite(s):

PREREQUISITE:  FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

Instructor:
John Twombly

John Twombly

John Twombly, Ph.D., M.B.A., C.P.A.

Mr. Twombly holds M.B.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business and he is a Certified Public Accountant.  He has taught accounting and finance at Northwestern University and the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School.

Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14W2
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 12 to April 30
Tuition: $1,325.00
Days/Times: Wed
6:00 PM - 9:00 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 4, 2014

Shakespeare: History Plays (BPASHP)

Shakespeare’s history plays are his own “game of thrones” in which ambition, power plays, and bloody revenge abound. These are at once family dramas—replete with love, jealousy, and betrayal among parents, children, and siblings—and political sagas in which Shakespeare shows us usurpers who themselves are threatened with usurpation. As Henry IV observes, “uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.” In this class, we will read all of the history plays in the order of the reigns of the monarchs rather than the order in which Shakespeare wrote them.

Note: No class April 26 & May 24

Prerequisite(s):

In order to register for an Alumni Course, participants must have completed at least two years of the four-year Basic Program curriculum.

Instructor:
Cynthia Rutz

Cynthia Rutz

Cynthia Rutz

Ms. Rutz completed her PhD on Shakespeare at the University of Chicago in 2013. Other interests include mythology, folktales, and ancient Greek philosophy and literature. She is a former Staff Chair of the Basic Program and currently teaches at Valparaiso University.

30 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S1
Location: Hyde Park
Dates: March 22 to June 7
Tuition: $415.00
Days/Times: Sat
9:30 AM - 12:45 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 21, 2014

Basic Program 3rd Year Classes (BPYR03)

Each course consists of a seminar, covering three or four texts, and a tutorial, which involves in-depth analysis of one or two texts. Students take the entire four-year curriculum in order, progressing with their classmates from quarter to quarter and year to year.

For the first class please read “To the Reader,” “On Idleness,” “On Fear,” “To Philosophize is to Learn How to Die,” and “That it is madness to judge the true and the false from our own capacities.”

No class April 26 and May 24.

This course meets in Cobb Hall.

Seminar Schedule
Week Seminar Book
1–2 Montaigne Essays (selections), Screech, tr., Penguin; ISBN 978-0140446029
3–4 Pascal Pensées (selections), Kraisheimer, tr., Penguin; ISBN 978-0140446456
5–7 Nietzsche On the Genealogy of Morals Kaufmann, tr., Vintage; ISBN 978-0679724629
8–10 Freud The Interpretation of Dreams (selections), Strachey, tr., Avon ISBN 978-0380010004

 

Tutorial Schedule
Week Tutorial Book
1–10 Dante Inferno; Pinksky tr., Farrar, Straus and Giroux; ISBN 978-0374524524

 

Prerequisite(s):

Years 1 & 2

Instructor:
Elliott Krick, John Melsheimer

Elliott Krick

Elliott Krick

Mr. Krick holds an MA in English from the University of Chicago and has been teaching in the Basic Program since 1965, specializing in poetry and film courses.

,

John Melsheimer

John Melsheimer

Dr. Melsheimer holds a JD from the University of Texas and a PhD in Political Science from the University of Chicago. His interests include classical and modern political philosophy, Lincoln, Homer, and Shakespeare.

30 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S4
Location: Hyde Park
Dates: March 22 to June 7
Tuition: $415.00
Days/Times: Sat
9:30 AM–12:45 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 21, 2014

The Arts of Affluence: Families and Inheritance (Planning) (BPOFIP)

Family legacies often have unintended consequences.  Through the close reading and discussion of fiction and non-fiction works and the consideration of two films,  this course will explore the types and consequences of family legacies and consider the ways in which such legacies can be designed to help and not hurt.  Texts will include: Hughes’s Family Wealth, Hausner and Freeman’s The Legacy Family, Williams and Preisser’s Philanthropy, Heirs and Values and Condon and Condon’s Beyond the Grave as well as Booth Tarkington’s The Magnificent Ambersons, Tennessee Williams’s Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and William Shakespeare’s King Lear.  

This is the third course of a three-quarter series; each quarter may be taken separately.

This course is open to all.

Note: No Class April 15

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Adam Rose

Adam Rose

Adam Rose

Mr. Rose has taught in the Basic Program since 1993, and is a former Staff Chair of the program. He is primarily interested in the ways texts affect human life.

He is the 2007 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

30 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 25 to June 3
Tuition: $415.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 24, 2014

Foundations of Western Metaphysics: Heidegger and the End of Philosophy (BPAFHE)

Description for this course will be available by December 2013.

Note: No Class April 15

Prerequisite(s):

In order to register for an Alumni Course, participants must have completed at least two years of the four-year Basic Program curriculum.

Instructor:
Clare Pearson

Clare Pearson

Clare Pearson

Ms. Pearson did graduate work with the University’s Committee on Social Thought, and pursues interdisciplinary work centering especially on ethical questions and experiences. She chaired the Basic Program from 2004-2008 and co-designed and chaired the Asian Classics Program from 2006-2009. Ms. Pearson received the 2013 Graham School Excellence in Teaching Award.

30 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 25 to June 3
Tuition: $415.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM - 1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 24, 2014

The Many Facets of Seneca (BPAFOS)

Seneca’s talents and influences are wide ranging.  He was the tutor of the young Emperor Nero, and helped govern the empire for what have been called the best five years of Rome’s history.  His literary corpus includes treatises on nature and science, tragedies, satire, letters and essays on philosophy. Early Christian writers like Boethius and Augustine were influenced by his Stoic philosophy, French and Elizabethan English dramatists (including Shakespeare) by his plays.  Readings for the class will include Thyestes, Medea, On Providence, On Anger, The Apocolocyntosis, On Earthquakes, and selected letters.

Note: No class April 15

Prerequisite(s):

In order to register for an Alumni Course, participants must have completed at least two years of the four-year Basic Program curriculum.

Instructor:
Zoë Eisenman

Zoë Eisenman

Zoë Eisenman

Ms. Eisenman holds an MA in Classics from University of Chicago. Her main academic focus is on Greek and Roman philosophy, Classical cultural history and gender studies.

30 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 25 to June 3
Tuition: $415.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM - 1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 24, 2014

Kafka and Borges: A Parallel Reading (BPOKPR)

Writers gladly share that they have been influenced by Franz Kafka (1883-1924) and/or Jorge Luis Borges (1899-1986). Readers who like Kafka tend to like Borges as well, despite the differences in the two authors’ thematic and stylistic treatment of the existential and epistemological questions that interest all of us. Through a parallel reading of Kafka’s and Borges’ most popular short stories (about a dozen by each author), we will explore the kinship between these two artists whose works have shaped the idiosyncrasy of twentieth-century fiction. Prepare for a ten-week feast for the imagination and vigorous workout for the mind.

This course is open to all.

Note: No class April 15 and May 13.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Katia Mitova

Katia Mitova

Katia Mitova

Dr. Mitova holds an MA in comparative Slavic studies from the University of Sofia, Bulgaria and a PhD from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her research and teaching interests include storytelling and artistic creativity.

She is the 2008 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

30 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 25 to June 10
Tuition: $415.00
Days/Times: Tue
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 24, 2014

Basic Program 1st Year Classes (BPYR01)

Each course consists of a seminar, covering three or four texts, and a tutorial, which involves in-depth analysis of one or two texts. Students take the entire four-year curriculum in order, progressing with their classmates from quarter to quarter and year to year.

Open to all

No class April 15.

Seminar Schedule
Week Seminar Book
1–5 Machiavelli The Prince, de Alvarez, tr., Waveland Press; ISBN 978-0881334449
4–5 Hobbes Leviathan, (Parts I and II, selections), Tuck, ed., Cambridge University Press; ISBN 978-0521567978
6–8 Kant Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals Ellington, tr., Hackett Publishing; ISBN 978-0872201668
9–10 Conrad Heart of Darkness Norton Critical Edition; ISBN 978-0393926361

 

Tutorial Schedule
Week Tutorial Book
1–8 Bible Genesis, Job, Matthew, New Revised Standard Edition; ISBN 978-0195283808 (other translations acceptable)
9–10 Kierkegaard Fear and Trembling Hong, tr., Princeton University Press; ISBN 978-0691020266

 

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Marissa Love, Claudia Traudt

Marissa Love

Marissa Love

Ms. Love has taught in the Basic Program since 1998.  Areas of interest include 19th century novels, Shakespeare, Japanese literature, lyric poetry, and the intersection of philosophy and fiction.

,

Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

Ms. Traudt holds an MA from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her art-making, research, and teaching explore modes of creation and perception in word and image.

She is the 2006 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

30 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S3
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 25 to June 3
Tuition: $415.00
Days/Times: Tue
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 24, 2014

Basic Program 2nd Year Classes (BPYR02)

Each course consists of a seminar, covering three or four texts, and a tutorial, which involves in-depth analysis of one or two texts. Students take the entire four-year curriculum in order, progressing with their classmates from quarter to quarter and year to year.

For the first class please read pages 1–16 of Treatise on Law.

Seminar Schedule
Week Seminar Book
1–3 Aquinas Treatise on Law, Gateway; ISBN 978-0895267054
4–5 Locke Second Treatise on Government, Pearson, ed., Prentice Hall; ISBN 978-0023933004
6–8 Rousseau Discourse on the Origin and Foundations of Inequality Among Men in First and Second Discourses Masters, tr. and ed., St. Martin’s Press; ISBN 978-0312694401
9–10 Shakespeare The Tempest Bevington, ed., Bantam; ISBN 978-0553213072

 

Tutorial Schedule
Week Tutorial Book
1–10 Lyric poetry Selected from The Norton Anthology of Poetry, shorter 5th edition, Norton; ISBN 978-0393979213

 

Prerequisite(s):

At least one quarter of Year 1.

Instructor:
Michaelangelo (Michael) Allocca, Eric Warshaw

Michaelangelo (Michael) Allocca

Michaelangelo (Michael) Allocca

Mr. Allocca has been a journalist, chef, classicist, linguist and theologian. He has taught in the United States and Europe, in disciplines including Sanskrit, Shakespeare, Santeria and Scholastic philosophy. He is the current Staff Chair of the Basic Program.

He is the 2010 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

,

Eric Warshaw

Eric Warshaw

Dr. Warshaw holds a PhD from the Committee on the Analysis of Ideas and the Study of Methods at the University of Chicago.  Eric’s interest is in understanding how we come to know and experience art.

30 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 25 to June 3
Tuition: $415.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 24, 2014

Basic Program 3rd Year Classes (BPYR03)

Each course consists of a seminar, covering three or four texts, and a tutorial, which involves in-depth analysis of one or two texts. Students take the entire four-year curriculum in order, progressing with their classmates from quarter to quarter and year to year.

For the first class please read “To the Reader,” “On Idleness,” “On Fear,” “To Philosophize is to Learn How to Die,” and “That it is madness to judge the true and the false from our own capacities.”

No class April 15.

Seminar Schedule
Week Seminar Book
1–2 Montaigne Essays (selections), Screech, tr., Penguin; ISBN 978-0140446029
3–4 Pascal Pensées (selections), Kraisheimer, tr., Penguin; ISBN 978-0140446456
5–7 Nietzsche On the Genealogy of Morals Kaufmann, tr., Vintage; ISBN 978-0679724629
8–10 Freud The Interpretation of Dreams (selections), Strachey, tr., Avon ISBN 978-0380010004

 

Tutorial Schedule
Week Tutorial Book
1–10 Dante Inferno; Pinksky tr., Farrar, Straus and Giroux; ISBN 978-0374524524

 

Prerequisite(s):

Years 1 & 2

Instructor:
Stephen Hall, Claudia Traudt

Stephen Hall

Stephen Hall

Mr. Hall holds an MA in Hebrew Language Studies from the American Institute in Jerusalem, a ThM in Old Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and is working on a PhD at the Divinity School of the University of Chicago.

,

Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

Ms. Traudt holds an MA from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her art-making, research, and teaching explore modes of creation and perception in word and image.

She is the 2006 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

30 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 25 to June 3
Tuition: $415.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 24, 2014

Basic Program 4th Year Classes (BPYR04)

Each course consists of a seminar, covering three or four texts, and a tutorial, which involves in-depth analysis of one or two texts. Students take the entire four-year curriculum in order, progressing with their classmates from quarter to quarter and year to year.

For the first class please read the Declaration of Independence.

No class April 15.

Seminar Schedule
Week Seminar Book
1–4 The Declaration of Independence,
U.S. Constitution, and The Federalist
Papers
Rossiter, ed., Signet Classics; ISBN 978-0451528810
5 Lincoln Gettysburg Address and Second Inaugural Address, Handout
6–10 Tocqueville Democracy in America Mansfield and Winthrop, trs., University of Chicago Press; ISBN 978-0226805368

 

Tutorial Schedule
Week Tutorial Book
1–10 Plato Phaedo, in Collected Dialogues, Bollingen Series; ISBN 978-0691097183

 

Prerequisite(s):

Years 1, 2 & 3

Instructor:
Stephen Hall, Claudia Traudt

Stephen Hall

Stephen Hall

Mr. Hall holds an MA in Hebrew Language Studies from the American Institute in Jerusalem, a ThM in Old Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and is working on a PhD at the Divinity School of the University of Chicago.

,

Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

Ms. Traudt holds an MA from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her art-making, research, and teaching explore modes of creation and perception in word and image.

She is the 2006 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

30 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 25 to June 3
Tuition: $415.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 24, 2014

Screenwriting: Scenes and Subtexts (WSSWSS)

Strong scenes, especially strong initial scenes, are passkeys that screenwriters must maximize to get their scripts past the first gatekeepers, the Hollywood readers.  Scene sequencing is a neglected method that helps writers organize structure to serve story while control of subtext draws reader and audience in and binds them inexorably to the character’s journey. In this workshop, participants will learn to amplify the drama in their scenes, gain control of structure through scene sequencing and heighten character identification – strengthening story and conveying theme – through masterful use of subtext.  Participants should come to class having read two screenplays to be assigned and be prepared to read, support and critique each other’s new or in-progress work.

No class on April 19 or May 24.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Susan Hubbard

Susan Hubbard

Susan Hubbard

Ms. Hubbard is an award-winning screenwriter whose work has screened at home and abroad.  She co-wrote Realization, a produced feature film, and has experience pitching to Hollywood executives in L.A. She holds an MFA in Film and Video from Columbia College.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 29 to May 31
Tuition: $575.00
Days/Times: Sat
10:30 AM - 1:00 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 29, 2014

CANCELED: Basics of Materials: Photography (OUARPH)

Artifact Collection Care Certificate Program Elective Course

This course introduces students to the cultural and technological histories of photography and provides insight into the management of collections in archival repositories, art museums, or your own collection. Students will discuss preservation and conservation issues related to historic and contemporary photographic materials; collections management strategies; and the appraisal, acquisition, arrangement, and description of photographs for museums with diverse audiences. During this course, the class will visit two local institutions for behind-the-scenes tours and presentations related to donor relationships, exhibitions, collections management, conservation, and the administration of research facilities.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Leigh Moran Armstrong

Leigh Moran Armstrong

Leigh Moran Armstrong

Ms. Armstrong is a principal of Armstrong-Johnston, an image research and archival services firm based in Chicago. Previously, Armstrong worked for the Chicago History Museum as an Imaging Specialist and a Collection Manager. Armstrong has processed private photographic archives and conducted historic picture research for publishers, designers, and production companies.

15 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 29 to May 3
Tuition: $375.00
Days/Times: Sat
10:00 AM - 12:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 21, 2014

Homer’s Odyssey, Books 16–18 (LACLOT )

“There a dog was lying, Argos, infested with ticks. But at that moment, when he noticed Odysseus nearby, he began to wag his tail and let both his ears droop down; but he no longer had the strength to come closer to his master…” A son returns home from abroad; a father finally meets his full-grown child; a dog dies seeing its master one last time after twenty years; and a mysterious beggar arrives at the house of Odysseus. Our journey into the Greek of the Odyssey continues, reading carefully together 120 lines of the poem each week.

Prerequisite(s):

New companions always welcome; must have at least one year prior instruction in ancient Greek.

Instructor:
Paul Mathai

Paul Mathai

Paul Mathai

Mr. Mathai is a PhD student at the University of Chicago Committee on Social Thought; his research focuses on Greek literature, philosophy, and history, as well as Russian language and literature. He has taught classical Greek at the Graham School.

25 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 29 to June 7
Tuition: $400.00
Days/Times: Sat
10:00 AM–12:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
April 5, 2014

Basic Manuscript Editing (online) (ETIBME)

This course gives participants a working knowledge of The Chicago Manual of Style, the most comprehensive and widely used style guide. The course covers many aspects of what it means to be a copy editor, covering the editorial process and addressing CMOS topics such as spelling, punctuation, usage, foreign titles, tables and graphs, and more.

This course is required for completion of the Editing Certificate. Students who have at least 12 months of copyediting experience in a supervised office environment and a thorough working knowledge of the 16th edition of CMOS may bypass the Basic Manuscript Editing class with permission of the program manager.

Synchronous sessions for this course are scheduled from 11:00am-12:00pm CST on April 12, April 19, April 26, May 3, May 10, and May 17.

NOTES: Students should bring the 16th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style to class. Pre-course communication and assignments are sent to all enrolled students beginning 3 weeks prior to the start of the course.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Erik Carlson

Erik Carlson

Erik Carlson

Mr. Carlson is Senior Manuscript Editor at the University of Chicago Press Books Division.

Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S7
Location: Online
Dates: March 31 to May 18
Tuition: $950.00
Days/Times:



Online Registration Close Date:
March 20, 2014

Workshop: Novel (WCWKNV)

We will undertake the careful consideration of narrative voice and prose style. Among our objectives will be the furthering of a lucid, metered, and precise language in “telling story” (i.e., bringing the stories “off of the page”). We will examine student manuscripts closely, considering such matters as sentence structures, syntactical precision and word choice in seeking to heighten the rhythm and cogency of your narrative language. On two occasions, you will submit distinct 15-20 page (or single chapter-length) excerpts of your manuscript for workshop discussion.  Along with readings/review of peer work in the workshop “round,” students will also complete two brief course assignments; a 2-3 page analysis of an outtake from a student-selected published novel during the early portion of the quarter; and later, a 1-2 page self-analysis of the student's own prose and its efficacy at forwarding narrative within the student's work-in-progress.

No class April 14th or May 26th.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Bayo Ojikutu

Bayo Ojikutu

Bayo Ojikutu

Mr. Ojikutu’s first novel, 47th Street Black, won the Great American Book Award. His second novel, Free Burning, is forthcoming. He was included in the “New City Lit 50,” a list of Chicago’s most renowned writers and literati.

25 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 31 to June 16
Tuition: $0.00
Days/Times: Mon
6:00 PM - 8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
April 7, 2014

Shakespeare’s Complete Plays (BPASCP)

In this course, we will read all the plays of William Shakespeare – whether comedies, tragedies, or histories – in what is generally recognized to be the order in which they were written.

This is the third course of a three-quarter series; each quarter may be taken separately.

Note: No class April 14 and May 26

Prerequisite(s):

In order to register for an Alumni Course, participants must have completed at least two years of the four-year Basic Program curriculum.

Instructor:
Michaelangelo (Michael) Allocca, Keith Cleveland, Claudia Traudt

Michaelangelo (Michael) Allocca

Michaelangelo (Michael) Allocca

Mr. Allocca has been a journalist, chef, classicist, linguist and theologian. He has taught in the United States and Europe, in disciplines including Sanskrit, Shakespeare, Santeria and Scholastic philosophy. He is the current Staff Chair of the Basic Program.

He is the 2010 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

,

Keith Cleveland

Keith Cleveland

Mr. Cleveland holds advanced degrees in philosophy and law from the University of Chicago. He began teaching in the Basic Program curriculum in 1968, and has taught many alumni courses on Plato, Aristotle, political philosophy, history, the sciences, The Tale of Genji, and much else.

He is the 2009 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

,

Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

Ms. Traudt holds an MA from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her art-making, research, and teaching explore modes of creation and perception in word and image.

She is the 2006 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

30 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 31 to June 16
Tuition: $415.00
Days/Times: Mon
10:00 AM - 1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 30, 2014

Plato’s Laws (BPAPLL)

Among the last of Plato’s dialogues, the Laws presents Plato’s thinking concerning a possible human community in contrast to the abstract Republic, which appears not to have been intended as a concrete model for an actual community.  The absence of Socrates from the dialogue and the numerous drafts of legislation involve the reader in problems about the standing of the dialogue, its relation to the Republic, and the meaning and effect of the laws that will govern the community.

This is the third course of a three-quarter series; each quarter may be taken separately.

Note: No class April 14 & May 26

Prerequisite(s):

In order to register for an Alumni Course, participants must have completed at least two years of the four-year Basic Program curriculum.

Instructor:
Keith Cleveland

Keith Cleveland

Keith Cleveland

Mr. Cleveland holds advanced degrees in philosophy and law from the University of Chicago. He began teaching in the Basic Program curriculum in 1968, and has taught many alumni courses on Plato, Aristotle, political philosophy, history, the sciences, The Tale of Genji, and much else.

He is the 2009 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

30 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 14S1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: March 31 to June 16
Tuition: $415.00
Days/Times: Mon
6:30 PM - 9:45 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 30, 2014

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