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CodeSection Title Instructor Quarter/Dates
WSBLPL 15U1 Best Laid Plans: Revision Writ Large Benjamin Lytal Summer 2015
Best Laid Plans: Revision Writ Large (WSBLPL)

Revision is a fundamental part of the creative process. Every day, we hone our sentences. At a larger level, structure changes. We work on an ever-changing scaffold. Sometimes, new works turn out to be revisions of older ones. Themes are revisited. Personal mythologies are seen in a new light. Sometimes a single work seems to grow old with us, changing with our lives. This course will examine the art of revision at the macro level. We will read solid, manageable samples from the lifework of Willa Cather, James Baldwin, and Philip Roth, discovering how stories were turned into novels, how later essays cast novels in a new light, how personal problems deflected the writer’s original intentions, only to eventually spur him or her to new heights. Students will write and share brief autobiographical accounts of their own work, and plan and outline the future course of their lives as writers.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Benjamin Lytal

Benjamin Lytal

Benjamin Lytal

recently published his novel, A Map of Tulsa with Penguin Books. He is a frequent book reviewer and a former editorial assistant for The New Yorker.

10 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to July 15
Tuition: $285.00
Days/Times: Wed
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 23, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

LAAHVG 15U1 CANCELED: Vincent Van Gogh Catherine Burdick Summer 2015
CANCELED: Vincent Van Gogh (LAAHVG)

Often portrayed as a misunderstood loner driven by mental illness and expressive genius, Van Gogh has had a seminal role in defining modern notions of artistic identity. This course will explore his correspondence, his personal history and cultural milieu, and the history of 19th-century modernist painting in order to better understand Van Gogh’s extraordinary paintings.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Catherine Burdick
10 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to July 15
Tuition: $180.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–12:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 5, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUNWB 15U1 Novels of Thomas Hardy: The Return of the Native... Clare Pearson Summer 2015
Novels of Thomas Hardy: The Return of the Native and The Well-Beloved (BPUNWB)

This class will delve into two novels of Thomas Hardy: first, The Return of the Native (1878), recognized as one of his major novels and modern adaptations of classical tragic form, and then the less-known late work, The Well–Beloved (1892), a character exploration written at the time of his greatest and final novels, which takes up a sculptor’s search to create the form of the perfect woman. Both novels work differently with Hardy’s conception of the blind erotic forces of nature in conflict with human social mores, and counterpoint each other. 

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Clare Pearson

Clare Pearson

Clare Pearson

did graduate work with the University’s Committee on Social Thought, and pursues interdisciplinary work centering especially on ethical questions and experiences. She chaired the Basic Program from 2004-2008 and co-designed and chaired the Asian Classics Program from 2006-2009. Ms. Pearson received the 2013 Graham School Excellence in Teaching Award.

18 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to July 29
Tuition: $260.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 23, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

LAHIBE 15U1 The British Empire in History and Literature Jim Lothian Summer 2015
The British Empire in History and Literature (LAHIBE)

The British Empire was the largest the world has known. At its greatest extent. Britain ruled over nearly a sixth of the world’s population and the empire covered nearly a quarter of the earth’s land mass. This course will treat the history of the empire from its origins in the 17th century to its dissolution in the 20th. Our primary focus will be on how the British people themselves understood the Empire. Readings will include the works of notable recent historians, as well as some of the most interesting literature produced out of the engagement with empire.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Jim Lothian

Jim Lothian

Jim Lothian

Mr. Lothian holds a PhD in history from the University of Chicago and has taught at Binghamton University. His studies include modern and early modern Britain and Ireland, British Empire, European intellectual history, and history of science.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to August 12
Tuition: $360.00
Days/Times: Wed
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 23, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUFOT 15U1 Norman Maclean and the Forms of Tragedy Charles Thomas Elder, Amy Thomas Elder Summer 2015
Norman Maclean and the Forms of Tragedy (BPUFOT)

“Yet we should also go on wondering if there is not some shape, form, design as of artistry in this universe we are entertaining that is composed of catastrophes and missing parts.”

What was the 78 year-old Maclean seeking in Mann Gulch, site of one of the great tragedies of forest-firefighting? What drove him to write his brilliant but unfinished memoir, Young Men and Fire? Through a close reading of his last work and testament—in conjunction with his renowned story, “A River Runs through It”—we will explore themes of tragedy, loss, personal obsession, and identity—and, above all, truth.

Please read the whole of “A River Runs through It” for the first meeting.

Students are encouraged to consider attending, In the Footsteps of Norman Maclean, a literary festival.  For information, visit, http://www.macleanfootsteps.com/

No class July 15, 2015.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Charles Thomas Elder, Amy Thomas Elder

Charles Thomas Elder

Charles Thomas Elder

holds a PhD from the Divinity School at the University of Chicago.  His particular interests are philosophy, social and cultural theory, and issues of modernity.

,

Amy Thomas Elder

Amy Thomas Elder

holds degrees in biology, Classics, and the study of religion. She teaches in and directs the Odyssey Project, an Illinois Humanities Council program providing college humanities courses to adults with low incomes.

12 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to July 22
Tuition: $180.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 23, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUBST 15U1 William Faulkner's "Barn Burning,... Claudia Traudt Summer 2015
William Faulkner's "Barn Burning," The Hamlet, and The Town: Beginning the Snopes Trilogy (BPUBST)

Faulkner famously affirmed that man will not only endure, he will prevail. We will explore this great humanist’s vivid embroilment of the Snopes family and Yoknapatawpha County denizens in the tremendous story “Barn Burning,” and the first two novels of his Snopes trilogy: The Hamlet and The Town. In close reading, we will wrestle with the edged complexities of grievous pain and gasping laughter, the webs of love, race, power, inheritance, honor, responsibility, possibility, fear and hope, grotesquerie and solace. We will consider how Faulkner’s imagined county makes and summons his real South, the real universe—and ours.

For the first class, please read “Barn Burning.”

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

holds an MA from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her art-making, research, and teaching explore modes of creation and perception in word and image.

She is the 2006 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

24 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to August 12
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 23, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

LAPSIR 15U1 CANCELED: International Relations Aditi Malik Summer 2015
CANCELED: International Relations (LAPSIR)

The field of International Relations (IR) explains and analyzes relations between countries. Much of the scholarly debate in IR is among three theoretical models: liberalism, realism, and constructivism. This course will introduce these paradigms and evaluate their salience in today’s increasingly complex global environment. We will specifically analyze the relevance of IR theories in three areas of contemporary politics: the conflict(s) between the West and the Middle East, the post-Cold War world, and the decline of American hegemony and the rise of China and India.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Aditi Malik

Aditi Malik

Aditi Malik

Ms. Malik is a PhD candidate in political science at Northwestern University. She holds a masters from Cambridge University in international relations and a masters from Northwestern in political science. Her research interests include the politics of East Africa.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to August 12
Tuition: $360.00
Days/Times: Wed
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 30, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

FSPVAK 15U1 Point of View with Adam Kempenaar: Crisis of... Adam Kempenaar Summer 2015
Point of View with Adam Kempenaar: Crisis of Faith Movies (FSPVAK)

A pervasive aspect of modernity is the crisis of faith—faith in family, society, friends, progress, or God. Crisis makes for great drama and this course traces the evolution of crises of faith as depicted in films throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. Directors to be covered include Dreyer, Bergman, Tarkovsky, and Bresson, and films such as Higher Ground, Ikiru, The Sacrifice, and A Serious Man will be screened in full or in part.

No class July 29.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Adam Kempenaar

Adam Kempenaar

Adam Kempenaar

Mr. Kempenaar is co-host and executive producer of the NPR film discussion show/podcast Filmspotting (WBEZ, 91.5 FM). He holds an MA in journalism from the University of Iowa and BAs in film studies (Iowa) and English (Grinnell College).

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to August 19
Tuition: $360.00
Days/Times: Wed
6:00 PM–9:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 24, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUFOT 15U1 Norman Maclean and the Forms of Tragedy Charles Thomas Elder, Amy Thomas Elder Summer 2015
Norman Maclean and the Forms of Tragedy (BPUFOT)

“Yet we should also go on wondering if there is not some shape, form, design as of artistry in this universe we are entertaining that is composed of catastrophes and missing parts.”

What was the 78 year-old Maclean seeking in Mann Gulch, site of one of the great tragedies of forest-firefighting? What drove him to write his brilliant but unfinished memoir, Young Men and Fire? Through a close reading of his last work and testament—in conjunction with his renowned story, “A River Runs through It”—we will explore themes of tragedy, loss, personal obsession, and identity—and, above all, truth.

Please read the whole of “A River Runs through It” for the first meeting.

Students are encouraged to consider attending, In the Footsteps of Norman Maclean, a literary festival.  For information, visit, http://www.macleanfootsteps.com/

No class July 15, 2015.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Charles Thomas Elder, Amy Thomas Elder

Charles Thomas Elder

Charles Thomas Elder

holds a PhD from the Divinity School at the University of Chicago.  His particular interests are philosophy, social and cultural theory, and issues of modernity.

,

Amy Thomas Elder

Amy Thomas Elder

holds degrees in biology, Classics, and the study of religion. She teaches in and directs the Odyssey Project, an Illinois Humanities Council program providing college humanities courses to adults with low incomes.

12 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to July 22
Tuition: $180.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 23, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUZMH 15U1 CANCELED: Readings in Buddhism: Zen Master Hakuin Clare Pearson Summer 2015
CANCELED: Readings in Buddhism: Zen Master Hakuin (BPUZMH)

In this class, we will explore together several of the main works of one of the most famous and influential Japanese Zen masters, Hakuin. Among other selections, we will read his autobiographical work Wild Ivy, explore the meaning of Zen koan practice, and work through his challenging and provocative commentary on the Heart Sutra. This course is open to those who are new to Buddhism as well as those with more experience.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Clare Pearson

Clare Pearson

Clare Pearson

did graduate work with the University’s Committee on Social Thought, and pursues interdisciplinary work centering especially on ethical questions and experiences. She chaired the Basic Program from 2004-2008 and co-designed and chaired the Asian Classics Program from 2006-2009. Ms. Pearson received the 2013 Graham School Excellence in Teaching Award.

18 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to July 29
Tuition: $260.00
Days/Times: Wed
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 19, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

LAMURM 15U1 Russian Masters John Gibbons Summer 2015
Russian Masters (LAMURM)

In the 19th century, Russia experienced an explosion of cultural achievement and produced a rich body of music influenced by the turbulent marriage of Eastern and Western traditions. We will highlight the flamboyant and coloristic compositional techniques of Borodin and Rimsky-Korsakov, radically different from the Germanic compositional tradition, and the elegance and craftsmanship of Tchaikovsky. We will also consider the presciently modern rhetoric of Mussorgsky and the virtuoso performance tradition of this music from its Lisztian origins to its indestructability on concert stages today.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
John Gibbons

John Gibbons

John Gibbons

Mr. Gibbons holds a PhD from the University of Chicago Department of Music. His works have been performed at the Rockefeller Music Competition and by the Minnesota Chamber Symphony. He received the 2005 Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies Excellence in Teaching Award for the Humanities, Arts, and Sciences.

Notes: No class on July 4th.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 25 to August 13
Tuition: $360.00
Days/Times: Thu
10:00 AM–12:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 24, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUMTS 15U1 García Márquez, the Storyteller Katia Mitova Summer 2015
García Márquez, the Storyteller (BPUMTS)

This course will consider a close reading of One Hundred Years of Solitude and a selection of short stories by Gabriel García Márquez with a focus on the storytelling genius of the Colombian Nobel laureate. We will explore questions of cultural heritage, time and space, plot and character, realism and imagination, crisp imagery and ambiguity of meaning, narrative rhythm and disruptions of flow. Most likely we will not be able to explain García Márquez’s enchanting realism but, together, through exciting conversations, we will have marveled at his magical worlds. We will have dwelled in Macondo.

For our first class please read García Márquez’s short story “Eyes of a Blue Dog,” and the first 40 pages of One Hundred Years of Solitude.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Katia Mitova

Katia Mitova

Katia Mitova

has been teaching in the Basic Program since 1998. She holds an MA in Comparative Slavic Studies from the University of Sofia, Bulgaria, and an MA and PhD from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. In her native city, Sofia, she worked as an assistant professor of Slavic literatures, literary critic, the Editor of the national quarterly magazine for literature and political philosophy, Panorama, and daily correspondent for Radio Free Europe. Mitova has published two books of poetry,The Human Shell (1994), in Bulgarian, and Dream Diary (2013), in English. She has translated (into Bulgarian) and edited 15 books of fiction, poetry, and philosophy. She taught philosophy and literature in the College at the University of Chicago and at present is a professional faculty at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Katia Mitova is the 2008 recipient of Graham School’s Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

24 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 25 to August 13
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Thu
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 24, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

WCSTGI 15U1 CANCELED: Beyond the Great Idea Lauren Cowen Summer 2015
CANCELED: Beyond the Great Idea (WCSTGI)

How do you go about translating an idea into a story? What makes for a great idea (be it fiction or nonfiction), and how do you find it? We’ll explore the ways that writers translate observations, memories, experiences, and insights into the germ of an idea that ultimately leads to a worthwhile story. As we climb inside a variety of published pieces, we’ll consider what may have been the initiating impulse for a story and how writers find a foothold in something as flimsy and intangible as a feeling or a snippet of memory. We’ll draw upon what we learn to launch our own ideas and develop drafts of stories that can be shared and discussed in class.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Lauren Cowen

Lauren Cowen

Lauren Cowen

is the author of three essay collections, including the New York Times Bestseller Daughters and Mothers, and a host of pieces in publications such as Chicago Magazine. Her work has also been featured on NPR.

10 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 25 to July 16
Tuition: $285.00
Days/Times: Thu
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 18, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUPLL 15U1 CANCELED: Plato’s Laws Zoë Eisenman Summer 2015
CANCELED: Plato’s Laws (BPUPLL)

The Laws, Plato’s last and longest dialogue, provides a counterpoint to the utopian discussion of the best state begun in The Republic. The speakers in The Laws (who do not include Socrates) set out to create a system of laws for a newly founded city-state, and in the process raise many questions about the nature of laws and lawmaking.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Zoë Eisenman

Zoë Eisenman

Zoë Eisenman

has a BA in Greek from Vassar College and a MA in classics from University of Chicago, where she has also done advanced graduate work.  Zoë is Chair of the Basic Program and has been an instructor since 1992. She has taught in the College at University of Chicago, and currently also teaches philosophy at St. Xavier University. Her main academic interest is the ancient world, and she focuses on Greek and Roman philosophy, Ancient history and literature. She also enjoys Shakespeare, Medieval literature and science fiction. She is the 2014 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

18 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 25 to July 30
Tuition: $260.00
Days/Times: Thu
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 18, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUHLE 15U1 Hobbes' Leviathan Joseph Alulis Summer 2015
Hobbes' Leviathan (BPUHLE)

Leviathan, the greatest work of political philosophy in English, appeared at the time of the last phase of religious war in the West and in the midst of the scientific revolution. The work reflects its age. Hobbes defines science and in light of it, develops his political science; explores what is meant by a Christian commonwealth; and treats with the enemy of both science and religion, the kingdom of darkness. We will read this classic in its entirety and see how our knowledge of the whole helps us grasp more fully the meaning of its more famous moral and political parts.

Please read the “Dedication,” Hobbes’ “Introduction,” and the first five chapters for the first meeting.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Joseph Alulis

Joseph Alulis

Joseph Alulis

has a PhD in political science from the University of Chicago. He has published articles on Tocqueville, Lincoln, Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, and the film maker Whit Stillman, and is co-editor of two collections of scholarly essays,Tocqueville’s Defense of Human Freedom (1993) and Shakespeare’s Political Pageant (1996). His most recent publication is “’The Very Heart of Loss’: Love and Politics in Antony and Cleopatra” (2013). He has held appointments at three area colleges, Loyola University of Chicago, Lake Forest College, and North Park University where he is currently professor of politics and government and chair of the department. At North Park his teaching responsibilities include American foreign policy, international politics, and politics of the Middle East. Joe first taught for the Basic Program in 1982. His scholarly interests include political philosophy, American political thought, and the thought of Shakespeare, Tocqueville, Lincoln, Dostoevsky, and Saul Bellow.

18 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 25 to July 30
Tuition: $260.00
Days/Times: Thu
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 24, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

WSPOET 15U1 Poetry Workshop: Mimic and Mirror Cecilia Pinto Summer 2015
Poetry Workshop: Mimic and Mirror (WSPOET)

It is said that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. There is much to be learned about our own work by studying and mimicking the work of others. Each week we will examine the poetry of a writer and identify the aspects of craft they use to enhance meaning, create experience, and dazzle us with language. In short, we will attempt to answer the question: how did they do that? An engaged examination of pattern, sound, visual representation on the page, and other aspects of prosody can enhance any writer’s work. Students will employ these tools to craft poems in response to the work we discuss bringing to bear aspects of craft and their own perspective. Strengthen your writing muscles with this vigorous exploration of the poetic toolbox.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Cecilia Pinto

Cecilia Pinto

Cecilia Pinto

has had her poetry and prose published in a variety of journals, including Quarter After Eight, Fence, The Seneca Review, Triquarterly, and RHINO. She has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize for poetry and has won the Esquire short fiction contest. She is a 2009 CAAP grant recipient.

10 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 25 to July 16
Tuition: $285.00
Days/Times: Thu
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 24, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

LAMUVT 15U1 CANCELED: The Virtuoso Tradition Marie Alatalo Summer 2015
CANCELED: The Virtuoso Tradition (LAMUVT)

Virtuoso performance has enthralled audiences since the jousters of the Renaissance tried to best each other.  Competitions amongst the famous continued, including the celebrated rivalries of Mozart/Clementi and Liszt/Thalberg.   As much as technical prowess has proved thrilling, the reactions to flash without depth and sacrifice of musical intelligence for the sake of celebrity have also been argued.    That said, virtuosity attracts audiences.  Are the audiences that are drawn to the technical superstar sustainable?  Does the technical giant attract listeners who will be captivated by the intricacies of classical music and crave more?  Can the performer be both celebrity and intellectual?

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Marie Alatalo

Marie Alatalo

Marie Alatalo

Marie Alatalo, pianist, has performed internationally, and presented lectures for the Chautauqua Institution, MTNA,  and on board the “River Countess”, which sails from Budapest to Amsterdam. She holds the Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the Eastman School of Music.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 25 to August 13
Tuition: $360.00
Days/Times: Thu
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 18, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUSDC 15U1 The Dead Sea Scrolls: Their Discovery, Content,... Stephen Hall Summer 2015
The Dead Sea Scrolls: Their Discovery, Content, and Significance (BPUSDC)

The discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in the mid-20th century changed our understanding of the Bible, Judaism, and Christianity. Since the discovery occurred concurrently with the origin of the state of Israel, their stewardship became entangled in a dynamic political struggle. The content of these manuscripts, however, significantly contributes to pre-rabbinic traditions of Judaism, and suggests precursors to ideas in the New Testament. We will read The Manual of Discipline, The War Scroll, Hymns, and a type of commentary to the Bible known as Pesher.

For the first class please read Geza Vermes, The Story of the Scrolls, Part One (pp. 1–92).

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Stephen Hall

Stephen Hall

Stephen Hall

holds an MA in Hebrew Language Studies from the American Institute in Jerusalem, a ThM in Old Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, and is working on a PhD at the Divinity School of the University of Chicago.

24 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 25 to August 13
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Thu
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 24, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

LALIVG 15U1 Virginia Woolf Irina Ruvinsky Summer 2015
Virginia Woolf (LALIVG)

This course will place To the Lighthouse in the context of Woolf’s oeuvre as a whole before settling down to her brilliant stream-of-consciousness narrative revolving around the Ramsay family at their summer home in the Hebrides on the Isle of Skye in Scotland. Spanning the years from 1910 to 1920, the novel explores problems of perception and subjectivity, coming to terms with loss, and the power of art.

 

No class July 3.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Irina Ruvinsky

Irina Ruvinsky

Irina Ruvinsky

Ms. Ruvinsky received her PhD in philosophy from the University of Chicago. She studied philosophy and French literature at the Sorbonne and the École normale supérieure in Paris. She currently teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 26 to August 21
Tuition: $360.00
Days/Times: Fri
1:30 PM–4:00 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 25, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

WSJSVC 15U1 Jumpstart Session: Creating Vivid Voices Mark Rader Summer 2015
Jumpstart Session: Creating Vivid Voices (WSJSVC)

Voice is the writer's mysterious thumbprint on a story, a one-of-a-kind combination of a writer and a character's diction, syntax, attitude, and perspective. We will consider a few examples of how writers create and sustain certain narrative voices, then we will focus on what is distinctive about your own voice and how to bring that sound and energy to the page.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Mark Rader

Mark Rader

Mark Rader

has had stories appear in Glimmer Train, Epoch, LIT, and The Southern Review, and been short-listed for a Pushcart Prize, O. Henry Award, and inclusion in the Best American Non-Required Reading anthology. He holds an MFA from Cornell University.

3 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 27
Tuition: $85.00
Days/Times: Sat
9:30 AM–12:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 26, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

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