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CodeSection Title Instructor Quarter/Dates
LAMUSQ 15U1 Beethoven and Schubert: The Sonatas and Quartets John Gibbons Summer 2015
Beethoven and Schubert: The Sonatas and Quartets (LAMUSQ)

For Beethoven, the sonata was his laboratory or workshop. It was the genre in which he experimented with his most audacious and original ideas, while the quartet decisively marks the culmination of each of his “three periods.” Schubert’s sonatas and quartets express his utterly complementary character in regard to Beethoven. Works such as “Rosamunde,” “Death and the Maiden,” and the final valedictory sonata trilogy represent the charming Viennese lilt tinged with death that is perhaps Schubert’s most compelling characteristic.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
John Gibbons

John Gibbons

John Gibbons

Mr. Gibbons holds a PhD from the University of Chicago Department of Music. His works have been performed at the Rockefeller Music Competition and by the Minnesota Chamber Symphony. He received the 2005 Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies Excellence in Teaching Award for the Humanities, Arts, and Sciences.

Notes: No class on July 4th.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to August 11
Tuition: $360.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM–12:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 22, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUTAJ 15U1 Two by Tom Stoppard: Travesties and Jumpers Claudia Traudt Summer 2015
Two by Tom Stoppard: Travesties and Jumpers (BPUTAJ)

Tom Stoppard’s 1974 Travesties and 1972 Jumpers are seriously madcap comedies and think-fests—each juicily provoking, and mind- and soul-haunting. Following on Remy Bumppo Theatre’s Spring 2015 run of Travesties, we will savor and examine its confluence of James Joyce, Tristan Tzara, and Lenin, avatars of Oscar Wilde’s folk in the addlepated Zurich 1917 memories of aging civil servant and Joyce nemesis Henry Carr. And, encountering the Incredible Radical Liberal Jumpers of the earlier work, we will confront the postures of academic philosophes, gymnastics mental and corporal, disillusion on earth and in the heavens; and a swinging bit of nakedness.

For the first class, please read in Travesties, Act One, through p. 23, Henry Carr's line: “...the Jesus Christ I'm out of it!— into the valley of the invalided—Carr of the Consulate!”

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

holds an MA from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her art-making, research, and teaching explore modes of creation and perception in word and image.

She is the 2006 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

24 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to August 11
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 22, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUEGF 15U1 Eros in Gothic Fiction Marissa Love Summer 2015
Eros in Gothic Fiction (BPUEGF)

In Plato’s Symposium, Socrates describes the ascent from bodily eros to a love of higher things: beauty, wisdom, and virtue. The rest of the dialogue undercuts this high-mindedness as characters teeter between restraint and abandon. Two millennia after Plato, Gothic fiction revisits the tension between reason and desire. This course pairs Plato with novels by Austen and the Brontë sisters: Northanger Abbey, Wuthering Heights, and Jane Eyre. We will consider the nature of eros, whether it can be mediated, its risks and rewards, and its power to create and to destroy.

For the first class please read Volume 1 of Northanger Abbey, and the Symposium through the end of Phaedrus’s speech (180b).

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Marissa Love

Marissa Love

Marissa Love

has taught in the Basic Program since 1998.  Areas of interest include 19th century novels, Shakespeare, Japanese literature, lyric poetry, and the intersection of philosophy and fiction.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to August 11
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Tue
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 22, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

SMCAPP 15U1 Sustainability Capstone Project tbd Summer 2015
Sustainability Capstone Project (SMCAPP)

The final course in the program seeks to apply the liberal arts strategies and technical knowledge explored in the previous quarters in a “real world” scenario. Students will develop a model sustainability plan for a hypothetical entity, although they may also choose to draw upon the real problems facing their workplace. Case studies and test scenarios from program partner companies and organizations.

Prerequisite(s):

All LSM curricular courses must be completed; plus, capstone application submitted and approved.

Instructor:
tbd
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location:
Dates: June 23 to August 25
Tuition: $610.00
Days/Times: Tue
TBA



Online Registration Close Date:
June 22, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPYR01 15U1 CANCELED: Year 1 Autumn Curriculum: Summer Makeup... tbd Summer 2015
CANCELED: Year 1 Autumn Curriculum: Summer Makeup Course (BPYR01)

This course is for students who missed the Autumn Quarter and for current or past students who wish to revisit it. The curriculum explores the theme of virtue: what is it, who has it, and what happens when an individual’s sense of right and wrong clashes with that of society? The tutorial is devoted to Plato’s dialogue, the Meno, which explores what virtue is and how it is acquired. The seminar begins with Sophocles’s Antigone, which shows the clash between Creon’s decree punishing a traitor and Antigone’s determination to uphold the traitor’s humanity. This is followed by two Platonic dialogues, the Apology and the Crito, which relate the trial of Socrates, his death sentence, and his refusal to escape even though he has been wrongfully condemned. The final work is Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, which examines whether the claims of law and morality are absolute or whether rare individuals can live outside the law and beyond morality.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
tbd
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to August 25
Tuition: $415.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 16, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUSPD 15U2 CANCELED: Poetry and Selected Prose of John Donne Claudia Traudt Summer 2015
CANCELED: Poetry and Selected Prose of John Donne (BPUSPD)

John Donne, metaphysical poet, lawyer, and dean of St. Paul’s Cathedral, was a man of crashing intellect and passion. From the earthiness, anger, seduction, bravado, and humor of “Song,” “The Flea,” “The Sun Rising,” and “Elegy: To His Mistress Going to Bed” to the fiery abnegation and witness of “Good Friday: Riding Westward” (“Burn off my rusts and my deformity...”) and the Holy Sonnets, we have one man. In poems and select passages from Donne’s Sermons and Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions, we will engage the shapeliness, force, exactitude, profundity, and pregnancy of his imagination, conceit–constructing wit, and expressive power.

For the first class, please read “Song” and “The Sun Rising.”

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

holds an MA from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her art-making, research, and teaching explore modes of creation and perception in word and image.

She is the 2006 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

24 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U2
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to August 11
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Tue
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 19, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

WSEDYW 15U1 Editing Your Work Jennifer McDonald Summer 2015
Editing Your Work (WSEDYW)

Learn how an editor approaches manuscripts so you can bring these same insights and interventions to your own work. In this workshop for writers of fiction and nonfiction, we will practice techniques for reading and refining that will have you thinking and acting as your own editor. Reading aloud from works in progress, students will learn to be active listeners and constructive critics, listening for patterns, repetitions, musical passages, false notes. We will examine larger points—what is the work about? Are ideas expressed logically and clearly? Are questions left unexplored? Do characters ring true?—as well as finer ones, analyzing how changes made at the paragraph or sentence level can vastly improve one’s writing.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Jennifer McDonald

Jennifer McDonald

Jennifer McDonald

is an editor, writer, and critic based in Chicago. Previously, she was an editor at The New York Times Book Review. She has also been an editor on the national desk at The New York Times and an editor and writer for The Washington Post. In 2012-13, she was a fellow at the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University.

10 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to July 14
Tuition: $285.00
Days/Times: Tue
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 22, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPURC3 15U1 Livy: Imperial Chronicler of Ancient Rome, Part 3 Zoë Eisenman Summer 2015
Livy: Imperial Chronicler of Ancient Rome, Part 3 (BPURC3)

The historian Livy wrote at the beginning of the Roman Empire, but preferred the ancient Republic as his subject. In this class we will continue our study of Livy’s History of Republican Rome, reading books 21 through 30. These books tell of the epic struggle between the two ancient superpowers, Rome and her rival Carthage, and how Hannibal’s invasion of Italy brought Rome to the brink of disaster. Livy’s account of these historical struggles also serves as a commentary on the contemporary events that he witnessed as Rome moved from Republic to Empire.

For the first class please read Book 21. 

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Zoë Eisenman

Zoë Eisenman

Zoë Eisenman

has a BA in Greek from Vassar College and a MA in classics from University of Chicago, where she has also done advanced graduate work.  Zoë is Chair of the Basic Program and has been an instructor since 1992. She has taught in the College at University of Chicago, and currently also teaches philosophy at St. Xavier University. Her main academic interest is the ancient world, and she focuses on Greek and Roman philosophy, Ancient history and literature. She also enjoys Shakespeare, Medieval literature and science fiction. She is the 2014 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

340
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to August 11
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Tue
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 22, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUSWR 15U1 Shakespeare's War of the Roses Joseph Alulis Summer 2015
Shakespeare's War of the Roses (BPUSWR)

Near the end of the Tudor dynasty, Shakespeare dramatized its birth a century earlier. Henry VI and Richard III tell the related stories of the end of the Hundred Years’ War, the Wars of the Roses, and the rise and fall of Richard, Duke of Gloucester. In this account of the years 1422–85, Shakespeare shows the meaning of the subsequent Tudor age, 1485–1603, and anticipates the Stuart age to come, 1603–88, and the development of the English constitution. We will read these plays to both appreciate their drama and poetry, and their political insight.

Please read the first three acts of Henry VI, Part I for the first class.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Joseph Alulis

Joseph Alulis

Joseph Alulis

has a PhD in political science from the University of Chicago. He has published articles on Tocqueville, Lincoln, Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, and the film maker Whit Stillman, and is co-editor of two collections of scholarly essays,Tocqueville’s Defense of Human Freedom (1993) and Shakespeare’s Political Pageant (1996). His most recent publication is “’The Very Heart of Loss’: Love and Politics in Antony and Cleopatra” (2013). He has held appointments at three area colleges, Loyola University of Chicago, Lake Forest College, and North Park University where he is currently professor of politics and government and chair of the department. At North Park his teaching responsibilities include American foreign policy, international politics, and politics of the Middle East. Joe first taught for the Basic Program in 1982. His scholarly interests include political philosophy, American political thought, and the thought of Shakespeare, Tocqueville, Lincoln, Dostoevsky, and Saul Bellow.

18 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 23 to July 28
Tuition: $260.00
Days/Times: Tue
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 22, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

FSPVAK 15U1 Point of View with Adam Kempenaar: Crisis of... Adam Kempenaar Summer 2015
Point of View with Adam Kempenaar: Crisis of Faith Movies (FSPVAK)

A pervasive aspect of modernity is the crisis of faith—faith in family, society, friends, progress, or God. Crisis makes for great drama and this course traces the evolution of crises of faith as depicted in films throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. Directors to be covered include Dreyer, Bergman, Tarkovsky, and Bresson, and films such as Higher Ground, Ikiru, The Sacrifice, and A Serious Man will be screened in full or in part.

No class July 29.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Adam Kempenaar

Adam Kempenaar

Adam Kempenaar

Mr. Kempenaar is co-host and executive producer of the NPR film discussion show/podcast Filmspotting (WBEZ, 91.5 FM). He holds an MA in journalism from the University of Iowa and BAs in film studies (Iowa) and English (Grinnell College).

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to August 19
Tuition: $360.00
Days/Times: Wed
6:00 PM–9:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 24, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUFOT 15U1 Norman Maclean and the Forms of Tragedy Charles Thomas Elder, Amy Thomas Elder Summer 2015
Norman Maclean and the Forms of Tragedy (BPUFOT)

“Yet we should also go on wondering if there is not some shape, form, design as of artistry in this universe we are entertaining that is composed of catastrophes and missing parts.”

What was the 78 year-old Maclean seeking in Mann Gulch, site of one of the great tragedies of forest-firefighting? What drove him to write his brilliant but unfinished memoir, Young Men and Fire? Through a close reading of his last work and testament—in conjunction with his renowned story, “A River Runs through It”—we will explore themes of tragedy, loss, personal obsession, and identity—and, above all, truth.

Please read the whole of “A River Runs through It” for the first meeting.

Students are encouraged to consider attending, In the Footsteps of Norman Maclean, a literary festival.  For information, visit, http://www.macleanfootsteps.com/

No class July 15, 2015.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Charles Thomas Elder, Amy Thomas Elder

Charles Thomas Elder

Charles Thomas Elder

holds a PhD from the Divinity School at the University of Chicago.  His particular interests are philosophy, social and cultural theory, and issues of modernity.

,

Amy Thomas Elder

Amy Thomas Elder

holds degrees in biology, Classics, and the study of religion. She teaches in and directs the Odyssey Project, an Illinois Humanities Council program providing college humanities courses to adults with low incomes.

12 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to July 22
Tuition: $180.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 23, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUZMH 15U1 CANCELED: Readings in Buddhism: Zen Master Hakuin Clare Pearson Summer 2015
CANCELED: Readings in Buddhism: Zen Master Hakuin (BPUZMH)

In this class, we will explore together several of the main works of one of the most famous and influential Japanese Zen masters, Hakuin. Among other selections, we will read his autobiographical work Wild Ivy, explore the meaning of Zen koan practice, and work through his challenging and provocative commentary on the Heart Sutra. This course is open to those who are new to Buddhism as well as those with more experience.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Clare Pearson

Clare Pearson

Clare Pearson

did graduate work with the University’s Committee on Social Thought, and pursues interdisciplinary work centering especially on ethical questions and experiences. She chaired the Basic Program from 2004-2008 and co-designed and chaired the Asian Classics Program from 2006-2009. Ms. Pearson received the 2013 Graham School Excellence in Teaching Award.

18 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to July 29
Tuition: $260.00
Days/Times: Wed
6:00 PM–9:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 19, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

LAAHVG 15U1 CANCELED: Vincent Van Gogh Catherine Burdick Summer 2015
CANCELED: Vincent Van Gogh (LAAHVG)

Often portrayed as a misunderstood loner driven by mental illness and expressive genius, Van Gogh has had a seminal role in defining modern notions of artistic identity. This course will explore his correspondence, his personal history and cultural milieu, and the history of 19th-century modernist painting in order to better understand Van Gogh’s extraordinary paintings.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Catherine Burdick
10 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to July 15
Tuition: $180.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–12:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 5, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

WSBLPL 15U1 Best Laid Plans: Revision Writ Large Benjamin Lytal Summer 2015
Best Laid Plans: Revision Writ Large (WSBLPL)

Revision is a fundamental part of the creative process. Every day, we hone our sentences. At a larger level, structure changes. We work on an ever-changing scaffold. Sometimes, new works turn out to be revisions of older ones. Themes are revisited. Personal mythologies are seen in a new light. Sometimes a single work seems to grow old with us, changing with our lives. This course will examine the art of revision at the macro level. We will read solid, manageable samples from the lifework of Willa Cather, James Baldwin, and Philip Roth, discovering how stories were turned into novels, how later essays cast novels in a new light, how personal problems deflected the writer’s original intentions, only to eventually spur him or her to new heights. Students will write and share brief autobiographical accounts of their own work, and plan and outline the future course of their lives as writers.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Benjamin Lytal

Benjamin Lytal

Benjamin Lytal

recently published his novel, A Map of Tulsa with Penguin Books. He is a frequent book reviewer and a former editorial assistant for The New Yorker.

10 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to July 15
Tuition: $285.00
Days/Times: Wed
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 23, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUNWB 15U1 Novels of Thomas Hardy: The Return of the Native... Clare Pearson Summer 2015
Novels of Thomas Hardy: The Return of the Native and The Well-Beloved (BPUNWB)

This class will delve into two novels of Thomas Hardy: first, The Return of the Native (1878), recognized as one of his major novels and modern adaptations of classical tragic form, and then the less-known late work, The Well–Beloved (1892), a character exploration written at the time of his greatest and final novels, which takes up a sculptor’s search to create the form of the perfect woman. Both novels work differently with Hardy’s conception of the blind erotic forces of nature in conflict with human social mores, and counterpoint each other. 

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Clare Pearson

Clare Pearson

Clare Pearson

did graduate work with the University’s Committee on Social Thought, and pursues interdisciplinary work centering especially on ethical questions and experiences. She chaired the Basic Program from 2004-2008 and co-designed and chaired the Asian Classics Program from 2006-2009. Ms. Pearson received the 2013 Graham School Excellence in Teaching Award.

18 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to July 29
Tuition: $260.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 23, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

LAHIBE 15U1 The British Empire in History and Literature Jim Lothian Summer 2015
The British Empire in History and Literature (LAHIBE)

The British Empire was the largest the world has known. At its greatest extent. Britain ruled over nearly a sixth of the world’s population and the empire covered nearly a quarter of the earth’s land mass. This course will treat the history of the empire from its origins in the 17th century to its dissolution in the 20th. Our primary focus will be on how the British people themselves understood the Empire. Readings will include the works of notable recent historians, as well as some of the most interesting literature produced out of the engagement with empire.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Jim Lothian

Jim Lothian

Jim Lothian

Mr. Lothian holds a PhD in history from the University of Chicago and has taught at Binghamton University. His studies include modern and early modern Britain and Ireland, British Empire, European intellectual history, and history of science.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to August 12
Tuition: $360.00
Days/Times: Wed
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 23, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUFOT 15U1 Norman Maclean and the Forms of Tragedy Charles Thomas Elder, Amy Thomas Elder Summer 2015
Norman Maclean and the Forms of Tragedy (BPUFOT)

“Yet we should also go on wondering if there is not some shape, form, design as of artistry in this universe we are entertaining that is composed of catastrophes and missing parts.”

What was the 78 year-old Maclean seeking in Mann Gulch, site of one of the great tragedies of forest-firefighting? What drove him to write his brilliant but unfinished memoir, Young Men and Fire? Through a close reading of his last work and testament—in conjunction with his renowned story, “A River Runs through It”—we will explore themes of tragedy, loss, personal obsession, and identity—and, above all, truth.

Please read the whole of “A River Runs through It” for the first meeting.

Students are encouraged to consider attending, In the Footsteps of Norman Maclean, a literary festival.  For information, visit, http://www.macleanfootsteps.com/

No class July 15, 2015.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Charles Thomas Elder, Amy Thomas Elder

Charles Thomas Elder

Charles Thomas Elder

holds a PhD from the Divinity School at the University of Chicago.  His particular interests are philosophy, social and cultural theory, and issues of modernity.

,

Amy Thomas Elder

Amy Thomas Elder

holds degrees in biology, Classics, and the study of religion. She teaches in and directs the Odyssey Project, an Illinois Humanities Council program providing college humanities courses to adults with low incomes.

12 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to July 22
Tuition: $180.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 23, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

BPUBST 15U1 William Faulkner's "Barn Burning,... Claudia Traudt Summer 2015
William Faulkner's "Barn Burning," The Hamlet, and The Town: Beginning the Snopes Trilogy (BPUBST)

Faulkner famously affirmed that man will not only endure, he will prevail. We will explore this great humanist’s vivid embroilment of the Snopes family and Yoknapatawpha County denizens in the tremendous story “Barn Burning,” and the first two novels of his Snopes trilogy: The Hamlet and The Town. In close reading, we will wrestle with the edged complexities of grievous pain and gasping laughter, the webs of love, race, power, inheritance, honor, responsibility, possibility, fear and hope, grotesquerie and solace. We will consider how Faulkner’s imagined county makes and summons his real South, the real universe—and ours.

For the first class, please read “Barn Burning.”

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

Claudia Traudt

holds an MA from the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago. Her art-making, research, and teaching explore modes of creation and perception in word and image.

She is the 2006 recipient of the Graham School's Excellence in Teaching Award for the Basic Program.

24 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to August 12
Tuition: $340.00
Days/Times: Wed
10:00 AM–1:15 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 23, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

LAPSIR 15U1 CANCELED: International Relations Aditi Malik Summer 2015
CANCELED: International Relations (LAPSIR)

The field of International Relations (IR) explains and analyzes relations between countries. Much of the scholarly debate in IR is among three theoretical models: liberalism, realism, and constructivism. This course will introduce these paradigms and evaluate their salience in today’s increasingly complex global environment. We will specifically analyze the relevance of IR theories in three areas of contemporary politics: the conflict(s) between the West and the Middle East, the post-Cold War world, and the decline of American hegemony and the rise of China and India.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Aditi Malik

Aditi Malik

Aditi Malik

Ms. Malik is a PhD candidate in political science at Northwestern University. She holds a masters from Cambridge University in international relations and a masters from Northwestern in political science. Her research interests include the politics of East Africa.

20 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 24 to August 12
Tuition: $360.00
Days/Times: Wed
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
March 30, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

WSPOET 15U1 Poetry Workshop: Mimic and Mirror Cecilia Pinto Summer 2015
Poetry Workshop: Mimic and Mirror (WSPOET)

It is said that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. There is much to be learned about our own work by studying and mimicking the work of others. Each week we will examine the poetry of a writer and identify the aspects of craft they use to enhance meaning, create experience, and dazzle us with language. In short, we will attempt to answer the question: how did they do that? An engaged examination of pattern, sound, visual representation on the page, and other aspects of prosody can enhance any writer’s work. Students will employ these tools to craft poems in response to the work we discuss bringing to bear aspects of craft and their own perspective. Strengthen your writing muscles with this vigorous exploration of the poetic toolbox.

Prerequisite(s):
none
Instructor:
Cecilia Pinto

Cecilia Pinto

Cecilia Pinto

has had her poetry and prose published in a variety of journals, including Quarter After Eight, Fence, The Seneca Review, Triquarterly, and RHINO. She has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize for poetry and has won the Esquire short fiction contest. She is a 2009 CAAP grant recipient.

10 CPDU
Course Documents (if available):
Section: 15U1
Location: Gleacher Center
Dates: June 25 to July 16
Tuition: $285.00
Days/Times: Thu
6:00 PM–8:30 PM



Online Registration Close Date:
June 24, 2015
Online registration closes at 11:59 PM the day before the posted close date.

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